first_img Robot’s sticky feet could aid space missions (w/ Video) The Smart Stick bends similar to the way that spider legs bend. A pressurized fluid runs through the actuator tube (green), causing the elliptical mini-tube to swell and the joints to bend. The fluid can be controlled to cause the Smart Stick to bend in different shapes. Image credit: Carlo Menon and Cristian Lira. Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. “Space applications require structures, mechanisms and systems that are able to fulfill challenging tasks, while keeping their volumes and masses to a minimum,” wrote the scientists, emphasizing the importance of gossamer structures in the space field. “By folding and deforming the mini-tube, mechanical connectors are avoided, making the system simple, reliable and light.”Besides consisting of light materials, inflatable mechanisms must also confront high-energy particles, charged particles, and solar and space radiation when traveling beyond earth. In this premier run, Menon and Lira developed Smart Stick for Earth conditions, and predict that Smart Stick’s future will depend on using more flexible materials and incorporating a closed fluid loop in the system. A closed loop would increase the hydraulic pressure as well as overcome challenges such as leakage and outgassing required for space travel. “Lightweight joints could potentially be integrated in several space mechanisms,” Menon said. “For example, they could be implemented in miniaturized robotic systems of sample distributed units, in miniaturized grippers, or embedded in foldable/deployable systems.”Even if it takes a bit more time for Smart Stick to encounter space, the scientists already have ideas for terrestrial uses for the fluid actuator component of Smart Stick. Lira is also investigating a wearable, elastic textile called “variable structure fabric” that comfortably improves people’s posture, which is especially useful when working conditions call for long periods of standing or sitting.”The actuators in ‘Variable Structure Fabric (VSF)’ involve a new conceptual design of miniaturized fluidic actuators, which are then inserted in cloth items,” explains Lira’s Web page (VSFproject.com). “Uses for it [include] upholstery, technical clothing, underwear, and vehicle interior linings (based on Smart Stick).”Citation: Menon, C. and Lira C. “Active articulation for future space applications inspired by the hydraulic system of spiders.” Bioinspiration and Biomimetics. 1 (2006) 52-61.By Lisa Zyga, Copyright 2006 PhysOrg.comcenter_img Citation: Future space devices inspired by spider legs (2006, September 7) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2006-09-future-space-devices-spider-legs.html Are spiders ideal space travelers? Not quite, but according to a new study, their legs may be. Scientists Carlo Menon and Cristian Lira have designed and built lightweight, bendable joints based on the micro-hydraulic joint system of spider legs. The duo’s inflatable “Smart Stick” must overcome many of the harsh conditions of space, such as temperature range, pressure and atmospheric composition. In a recent issue of Bioinspiration and Biomimetics, Menon and Lira explain how most animals use muscles to bend their joints, but spiders don’t possess such extensors. Instead, these boneless arachnids have legs that are attached to the prosoma, or the main body, which pumps out fluid into the legs by contracting and expanding. Although spiders don’t have veins or even true blood, a pressurized liquid called haemolymph fills the open spaces throughout a spider’s body.”Our research approach is to find inspiration from nature to conceive new space engineering systems,” Menon told PhysOrg.com. “We realized that the characteristics of spiders’ hydraulic systems fit the need of great miniaturization and high force/mass ration required by space actuators.” The scientists’ Smart Stick, at 1 mm in diameter, is only slightly larger than a real spider’s leg. With one joint, the stick can bend about 1.8 degrees, and the scientists have developed a simple, modular system that enables the connection of several elastic joints for further bending. Each module consists of an inflatable elastic actuator that separates different segments, and a tube runs between each joint. To bend the Smart Stick, water in the tube is pressurized, causing the elastic actuators to fill with water and push the segments apart (see figure). Sensors measure the pressure and then provide feedback to the control unit, where more or less water is pressurized. Like other spiders, this Mexican Redknee (Brachypelma Smithii) tarantula bends its legs not with muscles and bones but with a pressurized fluid system that extends and contracts the joints. Scientists have created devices for space robots and even clothing based on the spider mechanism. Photo credit: Jurgen E. Haug.last_img read more

first_img New X-ray source in nearby galaxy spawns mystery © 2011 PhysOrg.com Journal information: Science Because only a few photons emitted from a binary star system are able to make their way to our planet, what we are able to see is quite limited. Because of this, very few binary star systems have been found. To get around this problem, the researchers turned to the Large Area Telescope that is part of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Rather than being aimed at specific points in the sky, it scans whole swaths over periods of several hours. In so doing it of course, comes across all sorts of signals. The team studied the signals that were found during one such scan and then picked out some likely candidates, then traced the signals back to their origin. One such trace revealed, for the first time, a binary star system that had been found by a systematic approach: 1FGL J1018.6-5856.What scientists know so far is that binary star systems come in two varieties; those that are microquasars, and those that are described as pulsating.Microquasars are believed to come about due to black holes pulling another star closer, creating fast jets at the top and bottom. The other, a pulsating system comes about, it is thought, when at least one of the stars in the system is a pulsating neutron star. In such a system, the two stars circle each other.The new binary discovered in the study is believed to be of the second type and emits a huge amount of gamma-rays (electromagnetic radiation of very high frequency) and lesser amounts of x-ray emissions, though the team believes that as the spin of the two stars slows, the relative amounts of radiation emitted by each will likely switch. The researchers also believe the pulsating nature of the star system was hidden by solar winds, which is why it wasn’t spotted until now.Based on their results, the team is optimistic that the same approach they’ve used can be used to find other binary systems, which would add immeasurably to the body of science surrounding such systems. More information: Science 13 January 2012: Vol. 335 no. 6065 pp. 175-176 DOI: 10.1126/science.1215895 Citation: Binary star system found by following gamma-ray signal (2012, January 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-01-binary-star-gamma-ray.html (PhysOrg.com) — To find a binary star system, which is where two stars are in close proximity to one another, astronomers have traditionally relied on pure luck. They’d first start studying what would look like a single star, then look for a radiation signal that would provide them with more information. Such a system clearly isn’t the best approach to finding such binaries, so a group of researchers have turned the tables around so to speak, as they describe in their paper published in Science, and have found a binary by first finding its gamma-ray signal and then tracing it back to its origin. Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

first_img(Phys.org)—Curtis Cooper, professor of math and computer science at the University of Central Missouri, has discovered the largest prime number to date, it’s 257,885,161 – 1. It has 17 million digits and is also a Mersenne prime (a prime number defined by the equation N=2n-1, where N and n are both prime numbers). The find was part of the Great Internet Mersenne Prime Search (GIMPS) project that uses a distributed approach to number crunching using volunteer computers. © 2013 Phys.org Explore further More information: www.mersenne.org/various/57885161.htm Prime numbers, are of course, numbers that can only be divided by themselves and 1 (and are greater than 1). They were first discovered by the famous Greek mathematician Euclid over two thousand years ago. Since that time, amateurs and experts alike have sought to discover ever increasingly larger prime numbers, though mostly for sport, as prime numbers have very few practical purposes (in recent years they have been used in cryptography). The process is difficult as there is no formula for finding them. Thus, blunt force has typically been the only way—choosing a number at random and then attempting to divide it by every number that is smaller than it is (tossing out obvious ones of course). For this reason, it wasn’t until people began building computers that really large prime numbers were discovered. Mersenne Prime numbers are named after French monk Marin Mersenne, who was the first to detail the formula for the class of special prime numbers, over 350 years ago. This latest discovery is just the 48th ever discovered. The GIMPS project has been exceptionally good at finding large prime numbers—it’s been responsible for the discovery of the largest 14 over its seventeen year history. It’s made up of 360,000 machines that together are able to calculate at peak times up to 150 trillion calculations per second. Cooper, clearly an avid member, has been credited with the discovery of two other large prime numbers found by the group. For his efforts this time, he will receive $3000. Much bigger prizes (from the Electronic Frontier Foundation) are in store for anyone that discovers a prime with a hundred million or a billion digits ($150,000 and $250,000 respectively).To make sure the number found by Cooper was indeed a prime, several other independent volunteer researchers verified it by testing it on their own computers.center_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. The sum of digits of prime numbers is evenly distributed Citation: University professor discovers largest prime number to date (2013, February 6) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-02-university-professor-largest-prime-date.htmllast_img read more

first_img Citation: Researchers propose foundering of lower island-arc crust explains continental Moho (2013, December 5) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-12-foundering-island-arc-crust-continental-moho.html © 2013 Phys.org (Phys.org) —Oliver Jagoutz of MIT and Mark Behn of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution are suggesting in a paper they’ve had published in the journal Nature, that foundering of lower island-arc crust can explain characteristics of the origin of continental Moho. This is a geophysical map showing the position of the Moho discontinuity across the Earth. The Moho is the boundary between the Earth’s crust and the mantle. Credit: AllenMcC/Wikipedia. It’s been nearly a century since seismologist Andrija Mohorovicic discovered that seismic waves traveled faster through the crust at a deeper point—approximately 25 miles down below the continents. That changeover point has since been named the continental Moho, after him. Since that time, scientists have spent considerable effort trying to explain why it’s there, but haven’t had much luck because it’s too deep to study directly. Adding to the mystery is that it doesn’t exist beneath volcanic island chains that rise above tectonic plates. In this new effort Jagoutz and Behn offer what they believe is a reasonable explanation for what has been observed—it’s all about foundering, they say.Foundering is where something sinks in water—ships founder at sea for example. In this case, the foundering, the researchers say, occurs beneath the crust—molten material hardens as it cools leaving a gap between the crust and the mantle. Foundering occurs when material from the ceiling above, falls in the mantle below. The researchers describe it as a type of crystalline rain, falling into the mantle—and whether it happens or not depends on how much heat is present. When it does occur, eventually the gap is filled and the formation of a Moho is complete.To come to these conclusions, the two researchers looked at data that describe rock samples found in Alaska and Pakistan—both have been proven to have made their way to the surface after formation some 25 miles down below, i.e. at the depth of continental Mohos—but only one showed evidence of having come from an actual Moho. The Pakistani rocks showed no sharp density contrast consistent with a Moho type boundary.This can be explained, the two researchers say, by heat distribution far below the surface. When there is sufficient heat (such as is found near volcanic areas) there is foundering, leading to the development of a Moho—when there is not, there is no such development. Seismic data backs up their claim, they say, suggesting that foundering may be the long sought answer to the question of how Mohos form. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.center_img Journal information: Nature Explore further More information: Foundering of lower island-arc crust as an explanation for the origin of the continental Moho, Nature 504, 131–134 (05 December 2013) DOI: 10.1038/nature12758AbstractA long-standing theory for the genesis of continental crust is that it is formed in subduction zones. However, the observed seismic properties of lower crust and upper mantle in oceanic island arcs differ significantly from those in the continental crust4. Accordingly, significant modifications of lower arc crust must occur, if continental crust is indeed formed from island arcs. Here we investigate how the seismic characteristics of arc crust are transformed into those of the continental crust by calculating the density and seismic structure of two exposed sections of island arc (Kohistan and Talkeetna). The Kohistan crustal section is negatively buoyant with respect to the underlying depleted upper mantle at depths exceeding 40 kilometres and is characterized by a steady increase in seismic velocity similar to that observed in active arcs. In contrast, the lower Talkeetna crust is density sorted, preserving only relicts (about ten to a hundred metres thick) of rock with density exceeding that of the underlying mantle. Specifically, the foundering of the lower Talkeetna crust resulted in the replacement of dense mafic and ultramafic cumulates by residual upper mantle, producing a sharp seismic discontinuity at depths of around 38 to 42 kilometres, characteristic of the continental Mohorovičić discontinuity (the Moho). Dynamic calculations indicate that foundering is an episodic process that occurs in most arcs with a periodicity of half a million to five million years. Moreover, because foundering will continue after arc magmatism ceases, this process ultimately results in the formation of the continental Moho. Mapping the Moho with GOCElast_img read more

first_imgTop view of the cavity for various frequencies of actuation of the silicon membrane and the corresponding modes (m,n) . The white dashed lines have been plotted to help visualize the nodal lines and circles. Credit: (c) Physical Review Letters (2016). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.184501 More information: Gaël Vuillermet et al. Chladni Patterns in a Liquid at Microscale, Physical Review Letters (2016). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.184501ABSTRACTBy means of ultrathin silicon membranes excited in the low ultrasound range, we show for the first time that it is possible to form two-dimensional Chladni patterns of microbeads in liquid. Unlike the well-known effect in a gaseous environment at the macroscale, where gravity effects are generally dominant, leading particles towards the nodal regions of displacement, we show that the combined effects of an ultrathin plate excited at low frequency (yielding to subsonic waves) together with reduced gravity (arising from buoyancy) will enhance the importance of microstreaming in the Chladni problem. Here, we report that for micrometric beads larger than the inner streaming layer, the microscale streaming in the vicinity of the plate tends to gather particles in antinodal regions of vibrations yielding to patterns in good agreement with the predicted modes for a liquid-loaded plate. Interestingly, a symmetry breaking phenomenon together with the streaming can trigger movements of beads departing from one cluster to another. We show that, for higher modes, this movement can appear as a collective rotation of the beads in the manner of a “farandole.” © 2016 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Journal information: Physical Review Letters Explore furthercenter_img Several centuries ago, it was noted that covering a plate with flour and causing the plate to vibrate resulted in the flour forming into different patterns, depending on the frequency of the vibration. Later it was noted that sand poured over the back of violin demonstrated the same types of properties—such patterns have subsequently been called Chladni Patterns and they have been used in designing musical instruments and other applications over the years. In this new effort, the researchers wondered if the same types of patterns would emerge in particles that exist in a water solution.To find out, the researchers placed an amount of multi-sized microbeads into a container that had a membrane stretched across a base at the bottom, similar to a drum. They next filled the container with water and then watched (and filmed) what happened when the membrane was caused to vibrate at different frequencies.The researchers found that the beads did migrate to form patterns, very similar to those in a dry environment, and they could be changed by adjusting the vibration frequency—but they also found that there were some differences. First, the patterns were not created the same way, instead of the finer grains getting pushed to nodes, they actually moved in the opposite direction, piling up at antinodes, forming what might be described as inverse Chladni patterns—due to a phenomenon known as acoustic streaming. But perhaps, more amusing, the team also found that under the right circumstances, i.e. causing vibrations that were off the resonant frequency, the microbeads could be caused to move in clusters around an outer circle, much like, they note, dancers engaged in a farandole.The researchers note that their findings could have practical applications, like using vibrations to move particles in a fluid across a surface to a desired location in industrial applications, or more exotically, to move cells on a surface into a desired pattern before allowing them to grow. Citation: Researchers investigate Chladni patterns in a liquid at microscale (2016, May 6) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-05-chladni-patterns-liquid-microscale.html (Phys.org)—A team of researchers with Université Grenoble Alpes in France has discovered that there are differences in patterns created in tiny particles immersed in water over a vibrating drum head, than in dry sand particles dropped on a metal plate and vibrated. In their paper published in Physical Review Letters, the researchers describe their experiments and the differences they found between the submerged particles, the patterns that developed and the mechanisms behind them. New theory linking brain activity to brain shape could throw light on human consciousnesslast_img read more

first_img Citation: New source of very high energy gamma-ray emission detected in the neighborhood of the supernova remnant G24.7+0.6 (2018, December 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-12-source-high-energy-gamma-ray-emission.html More information: MAGIC Collaboration. Discovery of TeV γ-ray emission from the neighbourhood of the supernova remnant G24.7+0.6 by MAGIC. arXiv:1812.04854 [astro-ph.HE]. arxiv.org/abs/1812.04854 1◦ × 1◦ significance map of the region obtained with MAGIC. MAGIC J1835–069 is marked with a blue line. Credit: Acciari et al., 2018. © 2018 Science X Network This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Using MAGIC telescopes and NASA’s Fermi spacecraft, an international team of astronomers has discovered a new source of very high energy gamma-ray emission around the supernova remnant (SNR) G24.7+0.6. The detection of the new source, designated MAGIC J1835–069, is detailed in a paper published December 12 on the arXiv pre-print server. The fading ghost of a long-dead star Supernova remnants are basically leftovers of massive stars that ended their lives in huge explosions called supernovae. Astronomers generally distinguish three types of SNRs, one of which is the composite SNR—these having rapidly expanding shells from the supernova blast wave accompanied by wind nebulae powered by young pulsars formed in the explosions. Observations show that composite SNRs are known to accelerate particles to very high energies (VHE), up to hundreds of TeV or beyond, in their expanding shocks or the relativistic wind surrounding the energetic pulsar. Therefore, such objects are excellent targets for observations focused on finding new sources of VHE emission.Located about 16,300 light years away, SNR G24.7+0.6 is an example of a middle-aged (around 9,500 years old) radio and gamma-ray composite SNR. A group of astronomers have carried out a study of this remnant using the MAGIC (Major Atmospheric Gamma Imaging Cherenkov Telescopes) system at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory in the Canary Islands and the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard NASA’s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Data provided by these telescopes allowed the team to identify a VHE emission from an extended source located 0.34 degrees away from the center of G24.7+0.6, which received designation MAGIC J1835–069.”In this paper, we study the interesting region centered around SNR G24.7+0.6 with Fermi-LAT in the energy range between 60 MeV and 500 GeV. We also explore with the MAGIC telescopes the region around it to investigate the spectral behavior above 150 GeV in order to constrain the emission region observed by Fermi-LAT around the SNR,” the researchers wrote in the paper.The emission from MAGIC J1835–069 was found at energies above 150 GeV and has been detected up to 5 TeV. The spectrum of this source is well-represented by a power-law function with spectral index of 2.74. The emission from MAGIC J1835–069 also has a projected size of approximately 98 light years and showcases an extended morphology. The newly found source lies between two known extended sources detected above 10 GeV by Fermi-LAT, namely FGES J1836.5–0652 and the FGES J1834.1– 0706.The origin of VHE gamma-ray emission from MAGIC J1835–069 remains uncertain due to the complexity of the neighboring region of G24.7+0.6. However, the authors of the paper suggest that it could be explained by cosmic rays accelerated within the remnant interacting via proton-proton collisions with the carbon monoxide-rich surrounding medium.”The detected gamma-ray emission can be interpreted as the results of proton-proton interaction between the supernova and the CO-rich surrounding,” the researchers concluded. Explore furtherlast_img read more

first_imgThose of you for whom malls are for every occasion, shopping malls across the city have readied themselves with their Christmas best. So grab your friends and family and head for the mall, because soaking in the spirit need not equal to spending money. At a Rajouri garden mall, there are a plethora of activities and delicious food to be had. A huge castle gate welcomes you into a Christmas themed Dreamland. The major highlights are a magic show by Anjaan from India’s Got Talent, dance competitions and fashion shows for all age groups, 3D animated laser shows and photo booths. Get yourself clicked with live characters and Santa Claus. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Another mall in Saket has live Santas, a 40-feet high Christmas tree put up, personalised Santa shop goodies like stockings, hats, ornaments with names on them, a candy town with cookies, chocolates, cakes, candy and treats. Also, there are musical performances by Monku and the gang and Wizard of Oz and games and rides.At a mall in Vasant Kunj, designer Manav Gangwani has designed the Christmas tree. Expect artfully draped Swarovski crystal chains on a golden frame, winding up on an internally lit central structure. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThe pop up store at this mall has an exclusive range of Christmas products. Customers walking into the pop-up store will get a fresh range of exclusively designed and manufactured products which have been handcrafted exclusively by the most reputed brands and designers.Another mall next door has created Kiddyland. There is a Candy Cane Christmas Tree which will shower hundreds of candies on the Christmas day. Kids can also dig into Chocó-land to take home goodies.Chefs will help them create Christmas cookie masterpieces which can be hung up on the tree.So don’t burn your pockets, just have loads of fun!last_img read more

first_imgJust about an hour away from the Capital in Manesar, far from the hustle bustle of the city, in the midst of nature, is the chance to get away from it all, kicking off with the First Prelude of the Escape Festival – Escape Retreats (Prelude I).This edition is a precursor to the main Escape Festival, which takes place annually at Naukuchiatal and has made a name for itself as a space, which celebrates an alternate culture.Escape Retreats will feature artistes from various genres of music with performances across Saturday evening. The idea of Escape Retreats is to bring weekend retreats for people within the precincts of the city and recreate the overall experience and ambience of the main festival. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The highlight of Escape Retreats (Prelude I) is the carefully handpicked musical line-up which leads you through a magical evening under the stars with various genres of music. The first set includes some good old classic rock along with some African fusion music and foot pumping Jazz funk music, while the second set will be more of Electronica.The aim is to bring together established and upcoming artistes in a unique space where the music changes across the course of an electric evening. The musical line-up includes well known names from Delhi like Grey Area, White Wizard, an electronic act from the city; while there is also an interesting band like Chalo Africa, a band which plays an eclectic rendition of Congolese music styles, western classical music, as well as Salsa Reggae and R & B. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThe two electronic acts from Goa up the ante and the tempo of the evening. JJJ brings cutting edge no nonsense dance music, while Giuseppe is a pioneer in electronic psychedelic trance.The Escape Festival started in May 2009 when a few musicians and like-minded people decided to get away from New Delhi for a few days. They chose a picturesque resort at Naukuchiatal, at the foothills of The Himalayas which became their Escape. Escape, has grown since then to become one of India’s foremost outdoor and first camping festival.last_img read more

first_imgArt lovers should mark 11 July in their calendars because India Habitat Centre will open its doors to artist Aruna Tewari. Tewari, a roseate student of art, known across the artistic acreage for her oeuvres in varied skills of pencil sketching, acrylics, amongst other art forms and she will be hosting a solo exhibition of works titled Dimensions of Love at the Visual Art Gallery, IHC. Dimensions of Love is a refreshing and expressive approach to a life of bliss and accomplishment. The artist believes that love is mystique so it cannot be defined. Love is infinite so it cannot be confined. ‘We have our own ways and means to experience and express love. Love is compassion in aloofness, humane in wilderness, faith in disbelief, hope in distress, sunshine in winter, cool breeze in summer, water in desert and fresh flowers of spring. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Love therefore, is elixir of life. Love leads us through difficult times enabling us to endure adversity and never fails in supporting us. None in this world can ever claim to be unaffected by this great emotion called love,’ says Tewari. Tewari being conscious of the fact that great work of art entails combinations of technique and emotion, works on the themes of Mystic Womanhood and ever-encompassing Sentiments of Love, and presents her canvas of imaginations at the exhibition. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixA refreshing and expressive approach to a life of bliss and accomplishment, the artworks celebrate Love as the most beautiful emotion in the world and presents it as the essential need of all living creatures.Being omnipresent in the universe like God, Love is compassion in aloofness, humane in wilderness, faith in disbelief, hope in distress, sunshine in winter, cool breeze in summer, water in desert and fresh flowers of spring; therefore being the elixir of life. This emotion is celebrated by the bold hues and colours from Tewari’s palette, by portraying the various dimensions of love, through the images of women who experience love in its most profound form. ‘What I envisage in my works of Art is love, purity and serenity as in my view these are the essence of a soul. I avoid sadness or negativity in my works, as in today’s chaotic world we are already surrounded by these. I hope people would experience love, peace and joy while gazing at my works,’ explains Tewari. Promises to be quite a treat so make sure you don’t miss it. WHEN: 11 to 15 JulyWHERE: Visual Arts Gallery, India Habitat Centrelast_img read more

first_imgThe programme that starts that 10 am will feature a talk by Rich Rice, Associate Professor, and University of Texas Tech, USA. It will be based on the topic – Multimodal Composing in and Beyond the Academy. Following the talk will feature Atul Krishna Binodini Devi creative writing competition in English in the genres – autobiographical writing. The theme will be given on the spot. The first three winner of the competition will bag a rolling trophy and an amount of Rs 2500, 1500, 1000 respectively with a consolation prize of Rs 500 each. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The fest will further have Quizzards, the Lit Quiz where the first three winners will get prize money of Rs 1000, 750, 500 respectively.  The quiz will be followed by Performatix, the enactment competition where participants will have to create and enact an original scene around a quote (pick your quote when you register). It holds prize money of Rs 1500, 1000 and 750 for the first three winners. When: 19 September Where: Janaki Devi Memorial College Timing: 10 am onwardslast_img read more