first_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Bath, NC People, Director of Music Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Belleville, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Pittsburgh, PA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Collierville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Terrie Robinson named ACO director for women in church and society Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Events Curate Diocese of Nebraska Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Tags Press Release Service An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Posted Jul 18, 2014 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Press Release Women’s Ministry New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Anglican Communion, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ [Anglican Communion Office press release] The Rev. Terrie Robinson, formerly networks coordinator and women’s desk officer at the Anglican Communion Office, has been named its director for women in church and society.Mrs Robinson1 has moved into the new role following a decision by the Standing Committee2 that more needs to be done to support Communion-wide efforts to promote equal, influential and safe participation of women in the life and decision-making of the churches of the Anglican Communion and society.Speaking about the change of role, Mrs Robinson said, “I’m very excited at the prospect of being able to spend more time working with women and men in the Anglican Communion to promote the full inclusion of women’s gifts, voices and concerns in the life, mission and structures of the Anglican Communion and beyond.The Rev. Terrie Robinson (left) with Africa’s first female bishop the Rt Rev. Ellinah Wamukoya.“There are already so many Anglicans committed to this, who bring every gift imaginable to the task. It will be a blessing to support them and to contribute everything I can to making sure that women are given voice and space wherever they are.“In many ways, my engagement with the Anglican Communion’s Networks will continue. They provide a vital mechanism for Anglicans who want to share their stories and resources, and who want to join in advocacy and pray for each other with greater knowledge and understanding.“I know how important several of the Networks will be to my own ministry as it unfolds. All the Networks will continue to receive the support they need from the Anglican Communion Office to make sure their activities continue to inform decision-making and action at the international level.”The Anglican Communion Office has also recruited Stephanie Taylor to be Information and Records Manager.Mrs Taylor, who come to the ACO from The National Autistic Society where she was Content Manager – Information, Advice and Advocacy.Mrs Taylor said, “I am a passionate believer in the power of information and the difference that dynamically, well-managed, accessible information can make to the lives of individuals, and the effectiveness of organisations. Effective knowledge sharing builds connections and makes things happen, and in a Communion serving 165 countries that’s vital.”Editor’s note1 As there are a variety of ways to refer to clergy across the Anglican Communion, ACNS uses the standard practice of the Church of England which considers ‘The Reverend’ to be an adjective. We therefore refer to priests as ‘The Revd’ once and subsequently use titles: Mr, Mrs, Miss, Bp., Dr. Canon, etc, as appropriate.2 The Standing Committee comprises members elected by the Anglican Consultative Council and of the Primates’ Standing Committee. See http://aco.org/communion/index.cfm In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Albany, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit an Event Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector Columbus, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Tampa, FL last_img read more

first_img Rector Belleville, IL People Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Comments are closed. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Press Release Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Collierville, TN Posted Dec 18, 2014 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Press Release Service Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Albany, NY December 18, 2014 at 5:04 pm What is “transition ministry”? The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Rev. Canon Meghan Froehlich[Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs press release] Bishop Stacy F. Sauls, chief operating officer of The Episcopal Church, has announced that the Rev. Canon Meghan Froehlich has been named acting missioner for transition ministry following a churchwide search.“Meghan was selected for this important position because she brings the strong technical and interpersonal skills essential to this work as well as an innovative mind and creative spirit,” Sauls stated.  “All of us who met her during this process believe she will serve the needs of the church well in this crucial ministry.”Sauls also expressed his appreciation to the members of the interview committee, which included members of the Board of Transition Ministry, Executive Council, the community of transition ministers and the Missionary Society.As acting missioner for transition ministry, her duties include overseeing the programmatic, managerial and budgetary responsibilities for The Episcopal Church Office of Transition Ministry, working with clergy, dioceses, transition ministers throughout the Church, and laity.  She will also analyze the employment needs and trends in The Episcopal Church in order to plan strategically and offer recommendations for transition ministry programs to enhance the ministry of transition with an emphasis on spiritual health and wellness.The acting missioner position is slated through October 2015, after which the program and budget vision set at General Convention 2015 will be implemented.Froehlich’s position with the Missionary Society is within the Mission Department.  She is based in Akron, Ohio.Most recently she was the interim canon to the ordinary for the Episcopal Diocese of Kansas and has served as the rector or assistant rector of churches in the dioceses of Ohio, Dallas and Western North Carolina. She has also been a chaplain, a faculty member of Fresh Start, a consultant and executive leadership coach.She holds a Master of Divinity degree from the Divinity School of Duke University and a bachelors degree in political science from Old Dominion University in Virginia.  She was ordained a priest in June 2000 in the Diocese of Western North Carolina.Froehlich begins her new position in Jan. 5.  She can be reached at [email protected] effective December 22. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Frogmire Anders von Vondervolt says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Featured Events Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Comments (1) Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Smithfield, NC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Froehlich named acting missioner for transition ministry Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Knoxville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Tampa, FL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis last_img read more

first_img [Episcopal News Service — Salt Lake City] The Rev. Gayle Fisher-Stewart served as a police officer with the Metropolitan Police Department in Washington, D.C., for 23 years. She is currently a deacon in the Episcopal Diocese of Washington.As a retired police officer, she has the right to carry a gun in the United States, but chooses not to. Addressing the Claiming Common Ground Against Gun Violence march on the morning of June 28 in Salt Lake City, she explains why the United States needs fewer guns and calls for stronger action to combat gun violence. Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Former police officer Gayle Fisher-Stewart speaks at prayerful procession against gun violence July 3, 2015 at 2:53 pm Thank you, Rev. Gayle, for a relatively balanced presentation on this subject. Let me say up from that I am inclined to agree with your armed clergy friend. That is, I think that if somebody is capable of safely and legally carrying concealed, that it should be their choice (in public places — most states give private businesses and entities the right to exclude concealed carry, which is fine with me). I live in a state that vets concealed carry with testing, extensive background checks, and licensing, which is all fine with me.But here is the topic that I think is more relevant. Discussions about weapons belie a larger question about the morality of self defense, which is a euphemism for what Martin Luther King called “defensive violence”. Is defensive violence moral? Is it ever moral? We have a longstanding theory of just wars. I can think of situations where defending innocent third parties from harm could justify violence. We might, like Bonhoeffer, choose defensive violence and confess it later as the lesser of two evils. Many Episcopalians probably do not give this much thought, because we live relatively safe lives. The most we have likely thought about how to deal with danger or violence is to call law enforcement. So I will ask a follow-up question: Is is any more or less moral to call the police in response to a threat versus we defending ourselves/innocents? My view is that calling the police is merely defensive/deadly force by proxy, and I do not see a moral difference. I only see a practical trade-off: the police are better trained and equipped, while a legally armed citizen on the scene is, well, already on the scene. I have met some very strong pacifists who will argue that using force or deadly force to resist criminal violence is not justified, especially in church. (Do these strong pacifists object to calling the police?) I understand here is a tradition of not bringing weapons into a sanctuary, going back to medieval times. I even had one clergy tell me that the preferred way to deal with a hypothetical situation of an active shooter in church was to essentially tackle him — as long as the sanctity of the building wasn’t violated by the presence of weapons (my paraphrase). Is that morally superior to only use one’s fists or feet to stop someone from harming parishioners? Is it morally superior to give a slower and less effective disarmed defensive response to a deadly attack? To me that hearkens back to Jesus’ criticism of the Pharisees about failing to take care of a practical needs just because it was a sabbath day. If you accept the premise that defensive violence is sometimes warranted, then the only issue I have with concealed carry of firearms is the qualification of the person carrying (hopefully ensured with background checking and licensing).Thank you for letting me post this. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Comments (2) June 29, 2015 at 12:26 am I served as a police officer in Massachusetts. I was issued a handgun. It was the only one I ever had possession of. I never owned my own handgun and do not plan to. Most people who are victims of gun violence know their assailant. In Utah there has been a rise in the number of murder-suicides and the murderer has taken the lives of their own children. When will we wake up from this madness and require background checks, licensing and training and ban the sale of automatic and assault weapons? Video Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Tampa, FL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Marcia Burchstead says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Job Listing Featured Events Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Gun Violence, General Convention 2015, In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Pittsburgh, PA General Convention, This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Collierville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA J.R. Robinson says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Press Release Service Rector Martinsville, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Jobs & Calls AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Belleville, IL Advocacy Peace & Justice, Submit a Press Release Posted Jun 28, 2015 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Smithfield, NC Tags Comments are closed. Gun Violence March 2015, Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC last_img read more

first_img Rector Shreveport, LA Posted Sep 3, 2015 Rector Tampa, FL [Lambeth Palace press release] In a statement on the ongoing migrant crisis facing Europe and the Middle East, Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby said today:“This is a hugely complex and wicked crisis that underlines our human frailty and the fragility of our political systems. My heart is broken by the images and stories of men, women and children who have risked their lives to escape conflict, violence and persecution.“There are no easy answers and my prayers are with those who find themselves fleeing persecution, as well as those who are struggling under immense pressure to develop an effective and equitable response. Now, perhaps more than ever in post-war Europe, we need to commit to joint action across Europe, acknowledging our common responsibility and our common humanity.“As Christians we believe we are called to break down barriers, to welcome the stranger and love them as ourselves (Leviticus 19:34), and to seek the peace and justice of our God, in our world, today.“With winter fast approaching and with the tragic civil war in Syria spiralling further out of control, we must all be aware that the situation could yet worsen significantly. I am encouraged by the positive role that churches, charities and international agencies are already playing, across Europe and in Syria and the surrounding areas, to meet basic humanitarian needs. These efforts may feel trivial in the face of the challenge, but if we all play our part this is a crisis that we can resolve.“We need a holistic response to this crisis that meets immediate humanitarian need while tackling its underlying drivers. I commend the UK Government for its strong commitment to the world’s poorest people through the delivery of the aid budget. It has shown global leadership by providing £900 million since 2012 to the crisis in Syria. It has also shown moral leadership in using Royal Navy ships to save the lives of hundreds who have tried to make the dangerous crossing across the Mediterranean.“I hold in my heart particularly those who are most vulnerable in conflict, and those who we have a special duty to protect. The Government has rightly sought to provide sanctuary to unaccompanied children, women and those who have been victims of, or are at risk of, sexual violence. I welcome this, while urging a renewed commitment to taking in the most vulnerable.“The Church has always been a place of sanctuary for those in need, and Churches in the UK and across Europe have been meeting the need they are presented with. I reaffirm our commitment to the principle of sanctuary for those who require our help and love. The people of these islands have a long and wonderful history of offering shelter and refuge, going back centuries – whether it be Huguenot Christians, Jewish refugees, Ugandan Asians, Vietnamese boat people or many, many more.“It has always been controversial at the time it happened, always been seen as too difficult. Yet each time we have risen to the challenge and our country has been blessed by the result.“We cannot turn our backs on this crisis. We must respond with compassion. But we must also not be naïve in claiming to have the answers to end it. It requires a pan-European response – which means a commitment to serious-minded diplomatic and political debate, but not at the expense of practical action that meets the immediate needs of those most in need of our help.” Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Comments (2) September 3, 2015 at 2:44 pm Your Grace the Archbishop of Canterbury,It is time for you to become more vocal regarding the plight of refugees. In the newspapers, on television, etc, etc. We welcomed your support of the homeless at St.Paul’s Cathedral but in this situation, the public have heard nothing from you. The Country desparately needs your guidance.I am not a Christian in the conventional sense, but understand that Christ said “Am I my Brother’s keeper?” I would say that the answer is a resounding YES!Yours in hope,Carol Henrys Rector Pittsburgh, PA Father Mike Waverly-Shank says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Comments are closed. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET September 5, 2015 at 10:17 am Remember the Bible says – Be kind to the stranger within your gates – for you were strangers in the land of Egypt. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Knoxville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector Columbus, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Events TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Archbishop of Canterbury statement on the migrant crisis Carol Henrys says: Refugees Migration & Resettlement Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Collierville, TN Tags Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Bath, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Archbishop of Canterbury, Submit a Press Release Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Belleville, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Submit an Event Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Anglican Communion, Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Albany, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Job Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group last_img read more

first_img July 18, 2016 at 11:35 pm I will always appreciate the role that Bishop Salmon played in my ordination to the priesthood in Charleston in 1998. It is a shame, however, that even in his obituary the Episcopal News Service continues its disingenuous reporting of how the Diocese of South Carolina left the Episcopal Church. The phrase “Mark Lawrence led a number of diocesan members out” of the church sounds as if he somehow duped a small group of individuals into departing. The truth of the matter is that the duly constituted Diocesan Convention voted overwhelmingly to leave, by a vote representing over 80 percent of diocesan membership. The minority who wished to remain in the national church boycotted the convention, which I covered as a journalist for the Episcopal Journal. The departure was an act of Diocesan Convention, not the whimsy or caprice of deluded followers of Bishop Lawrence, as ENS continues to suggest in news stories. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group By ENS staffPosted Jun 29, 2016 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Belleville, IL Comments (4) Carolyn Duty Banks says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH RIP: Former Diocese of South Carolina Bishop Edward L. Salmon Jr. Rector Albany, NY Submit a Press Release Rector Shreveport, LA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Rev. Canon E. T. Malone, Jr. says: Tags Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Press Release Service Featured Events New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Obituary, Comments are closed. carolyn yost says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Music Morristown, NJ July 11, 2016 at 2:39 pm I first met Ed when he lived next door to my parents, Lois and Jeff Duty. He and my father became fast friends. I know they missed him when he moved to Fayetteville but I teased them that their loss was our gain. My son served as an acolyte at Ed’s wedding to Louise. My husband and I spent many good evenings at Ed’s dinner table and in fireside conversations. We missed him when he moved to St. Louis….and I still miss him. He was a good man.center_img Submit a Job Listing Rector Smithfield, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Rt. Rev. Edward L. Salmon Jr.[Episcopal News Service] The Rt. Rev. Edward L. Salmon Jr., 13th bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina, died June 29 in St. Louis, Missouri, at age 82.A memorial Eucharist for Bishop Salmon will be held July 2 at 11:00 a.m. at Grace Church Cathedral in Charleston, South Carolina. The Rev. Dow Sanderson will preach.The Church of St. Michael and St. George near St. Louis will keep a vigil beginning July 6 and funeral services will follow on July 7.Salmon was born in Natchez, Mississippi, on Jan. 30, 1934. He graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of the South in 1956. In 1960, he graduated from Virginia Theological Seminary, and was ordained a deacon in 1960 and priest 1961 in the Diocese of Arkansas.He served a number of congregations in Arkansas in the 1960s and 1970s: St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Rogers; St. James Episcopal Church, Eureka Springs; St. Thomas Episcopal Church, Springdale; and Grace Episcopal Church, Siloam Springs. He served as associate rector and rector at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Fayetteville from 1968-1978, then went to the Church of St. Michael and St. George in Clayton, Missouri, where he was rector from 1978-89.He was elected as the 13th bishop of the Diocese of South Carolina on Sept. 9, 1989, and consecrated Feb. 24, 1990. He served until January 2008. In retirement he continued as a member of the House of Bishops of the Episcopal Church and participated in the 78th General Convention in Salt Lake City last summer.Four years after Salmon left the South Carolina see, his successor Mark Lawrence led a number of diocese members out of the Episcopal Church in dispute over policy decisions made by the wider church. Those who wished to remain in The Episcopal Church are now part of what is known as The Episcopal Church in South Carolina, so named since Jan. 26, 2013, as part of on-going litigation related to the dispute.Bishop Provisional Charlie vonRosenberg of the Episcopal Church in South Carolina said June 29 that Salmon had served in South Carolina during a significant part of his time as bishop of East Tennessee, and thus they were colleagues. “Ed had a unique leadership style among bishops, and he could be counted on to offer his particular point of view on most matters,” he said in a statement. “His perspectives and personality were assets among his fellow bishops. He will certainly be missed.”In 2007, Salmon was awarded South Carolina’s highest civilian honor, the Order of the Palmetto. He served on the board of Kanuga Conferences, Hendersonville, North Carolina, and in leadership positions at schools and organizations including the University of the South, Voorhees College, Porter-Gaud School, Bishop Gadsden retirement community, York Place, and the Province IV House of Bishops. He served as dean of Nashotah House Theological Seminary in Wisconsin from 2011-2014. He also chaired the Anglican Digest board of trustees for many years.He married Louise Hack in 1972 and they have two children, Catherine and Edward, III. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit an Event Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT April 24, 2017 at 9:56 am Greatest Christian Gentleman I’ve ever met ! “Good night sweet prince , And bands of angels sing thee to thy rest” Rector Martinsville, VA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Hopkinsville, KY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA People Rector Tampa, FL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Charles Jeffress says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET July 11, 2016 at 5:25 pm I knew ED in Springdale, Arkansas,,he and my late husband were good friends, in fact my husband built the rectory for him in Rogers, Arkansas,,many meals we shared with him. He was a strong influence in my husband studying for the diaconate. We visited with him several times in Charleston..He will be missed. God blesslast_img read more

first_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit an Event Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC El Rvdmo. Carl Wright, recién ordenado y consagrado obispo sufragáneo para las Fuerzas Armadas y los ministerios federales, recibe el aplauso de la congregación reunida en la Catedral Nacional de Washington. Foto de Donovan Marks/Catedral Nacional de Washington.[Episcopal News Service — Washington, D.C.] Carl Wright, rector y ex capellán de la fuerza Aérea se convirtió el 11 de febrero en el obispo sufragáneo de la Iglesia Episcopal para las Fuerzas Armadas y los ministerios federales durante un oficio con nutrida presencia de obispos, clérigos, laicos y militares.El Rdo. Harold Lewis, rector emérito de la iglesia de El Calvario [Calvary Church] en Pittsburgh, Pensilvania, y mentor de Wright durante mucho tiempo, resaltó la pompa y precisión del oficio con enérgicas palabras durante su sermón pronunciado desde el púlpito de Cantórbery de la Catedral Nacional de Washington. Lewis le dijo a Wright que él estaba “a punto de entrar en un ministerio cuyos retos bien pueden ser únicos entre los de tus hermanas y hermanos obispos”.“A veces te encontrarás en una u otra Babilonia moderna, cantando la canción del Señor en una tierra extraña”, dijo Lewis. “Serás una paradoja viviente: habiendo sido un oficial que no porta armas, ahora eres un amante de la paz que ministra a los que se preparan para la guerra y la emprenden”.“Serás una paradoja viviente: habiendo sido un oficial que no porta armas, ahora eres un amante de la paz que ministra a los que se preparan para la guerra y la emprenden” le dijo el Rdo. Harold Lewis a Carl Wright en su sermón en la ordenación y consagración de este último como obispo sufragáneo para las Fuerzas Armadas y los ministerios federales el 11 de febrero en la Catedral Nacional de Washington. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.Lewis le recordó a Wright que él y los capellanes a su cuidado ministran a “soldados, reclusos y veteranos” y a sus familias. Muchos de ellos padecen de estrés postraumático así como de lesiones morales, una afección “proveniente de experiencias que incluyen las dañinas secuelas de exponerse a la guerra, tanto como experiencias que profundamente transgreden creencias y expectativas morales sostenidas durante mucho tiempo”.Además, le recordó a Wright que debe ministrar a un microcosmos de la sociedad estadounidense, con un índice de suicidios mucho más alto que el resto de la población.Él instó a Wright, que se enjugaba los ojos sentado en el primer banco, a “ayudar a los que ministres a expresar y vivir conforme a su fe en Aquel que es llamado el Príncipe de la Paz”. Lewis se refirió a lo que estaba a punto de ocurrir durante la consagración  o lo que él definió como “acaso el acto más dramático del repertorio litúrgico de la Iglesia”.  La “banda de obispos enfundados en sus voluminosos roquetes con esas mangas insoportablemente abultadas”  no tardarían en rodearlo y ocultarlo de la vista [de los demás] “de manera que no será del todo obvio para la congregación lo que se disponen a hacer”.“Mi oración por ti hoy es que al tiempo de asumir este nuevo ministerio, nunca, nunca le des a los fieles ninguna razón para creer que esos obispos se ocuparon de extraerte la columna vertebral”.Lewis añadió que él tenía fe en que Wright “ evitaría el superficial consejo que durante mucho tiempo le dieran a los obispos de que, para ser efectivos en ese cargo, todo lo que tenías que hacer era presentarte y revestirte”.El Rdo. Michael Barlowe, registrador de ordenaciones y consagraciones; la obispa sufragánea de la Diócesis de Los Ángeles Diane Jardine Bruce; el teniente coronel retirado de la fuerza Aérea John Symons; el comandante Mark Winward, capellán de la Armada y del Comando de Operaciones Especiales de EE.UU.; la Rda. Gay Clark Jennings, presidente de la Cámara de Diputados y la obispa auxiliar de Maryland Chilton Knudsen se preparan para su participación en el oficio. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.Por el contrario, le dijo él a Wright, que “en una sociedad con exceso de religiones y teologías y espiritualidades para escoger, las cuales cada vez se parecen menos a la fe que una vez le fuera dada a los santos, y en una nación cuyos líderes manifiestan cada vez más la conducta arrogante, poco caritativa y egoísta que aquejó a los corintios y que llevó a Pablo a amonestarles por creerse más importantes de los que debían, harás bien, como soldado de la cruz que eres, en levantarte en defensa de Jesús”.El obispo primado Michael Curry fue el principal consagrante en la ordenación y consagración de Wright. Los tres últimos obispos sufragáneos [de las fuerzas Armadas] —James “Jay” Magness, George Packard y Charles Keyser— participaron como obispos consagrantes, como lo hizo el actual obispo de Maryland, Eugene Sutton; el 11º. Obispo de Maryland, A. Theodore Eastman y el Rdo. Richard Graham, obispo del Sínodo Metropolitano de Washington D.C. de la Iglesia Evangélica Luterana en América.Varios otros obispos episcopales participaron en la ceremonia de imposición de manos. Capellanes y oficiales de las Fuerzas Armadas, en servicio activo y jubilados, también desempeñaron papeles en el oficio.Wright era el rector de la iglesia episcopal de San Andrés [St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church] en Pasadena, Maryland, en la Diócesis de Maryland, cuando la Cámara de Obispos lo eligió el 20 de septiembre. En su carrera militar, él ha servido como subcapellán del Comando Global de la Fuerza Aérea en la base de este cuerpo en Barksdale, Luisiana. Nombrado capellán de la Fuerza Aérea desde 1993, Wright es miembro asociado de la orden religiosa anglicana de la Santa Cruz. Más información biográfica acerca de Wright puede encontrarse aquí.El Rvdmo. Carl Wright celebra la eucaristía el 11 de febrero en la Catedral Nacional de Washington. La Rda. Laren Welch, presidente de la Asociación de Diáconos Episcopales se encuentra a su izquierda. Foto de Donovan Marks/Catedral Nacional de Washington.El obispo sufragáneo [de las fuerzas Armadas] supervisa a los capellanes episcopales de los departamentos de Defensa y de Asuntos de los Veteranos y de la Dirección Federal de Prisiones. El Obispo, quien le rinde cuentas al Obispo Primado, debe avalar con su respaldo a las personas que han de ser capellanes de las Fuerzas Armadas. Información sobre los deberes del obispo puede encontrarse aquí.La ordenación y consagración de Wright en la Catedral Nacional de Washington se produjo al día siguiente de que él y otros se unieran a Curry para comenzar una vigilia de 24 horas por la paz que tuvo lugar en la Catedral y en otros lugares.La eucaristía en el Gran Coro, con la cual comenzó la vigilia, fue una reunión para orar “por la paz del mundo, por la paz entre las naciones y pueblos”, dijo Curry en su sermón. Era también, añadió él, una manera de dar gracias por el ministerio de Magness, el predecesor inmediato de Wright, y de orar por el nuevo ministerio de próximo séptimo obispo sufragáneo [de las Fuerzas Armadas].El obispo primado Michael Curry predica el 10 de febrero en el Gran Coro de la Catedral Nacional de Washington en un oficio eucarístico con el que comenzó una vigilia de 24 horas por la paz. La vigilia tuvo lugar antes de la ordenación y consagración del Ven. Carl Wright como obispo sufragáneo de la Iglesia para las Fuerzas Armadas y los ministerios federales. Foto de Danielle Thomas/Catedral Nacional de Washington.Curry también le dio gracias a la “Hermandad Episcopal de la Paz [EPF por su sigla en inglés] por su antiguo testimonio y su profética defensa de la paz de Dios en medio de los conflictos de la humanidad”.La eucaristía y la subsecuente vigilia en la Capilla en Recordación de la Guerra fue un empeño conjunto de la Hermandad Episcopal de la Paz y la Oficina de Ministerios Federales de la Iglesia Episcopal. La vigilia fue la cuarta de este tipo que se celebra. La primera tuvo lugar en 1990, cuando [el obispo sufragáneo de las Fuerzas Armadas] Keyser le pidió a la EPF que se le uniera en auspiciar una vigilia de oración por la paz 24 horas antes de su consagración. Hubo voluntarios que se presentaron hora tras hora para orar por la paz, tanto en la capilla como en algún otro local en torno a la iglesia.El evangelio para el oficio fue la versión de Mateo del final del Sermón del Monte en el cual Jesús le dice a sus escuchas que amen a sus enemigos y oren por los que les persiguen.“Jesús no dijo  ‘apruébenlos’, no dijo ‘convengan con ellos’ y no dijo ‘déjenles hacer lo que quieran’, pero sí dijo ‘ámenlos’”, recalcó Curry.Kathy Boylan de la Casa de Obreras Católicas de Washington, D.C. vino a la eucaristía de la vigilia con dos fundas de almohadas convertidas en pancartas y puestas encima para protestar por la militarización de la capellanía de las Fuerzas Armadas y la cantidad de dinero de los contribuyentes que sostiene la guerra. El letrero a sus espaldas dice Impuestos federales = guerra, brutalidad policial, tortura, drones. No los pagues” . Ella luego le obsequió algunos materiales al obispo primado Michael Curry. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.Jesús sintetiza toda su enseñanza en el Sermón del Monte, dijo Curry, y parte de la lección es que “bienaventuradas son las personas que se atreven a trabajar y laborar incesantemente noche y día por la paz del mundo”.Curry recordó la profecía de Isaías 2:1-4 de las espadas convertidas en arados y las lanzas en hoces. El Obispo Primado dijo que la visión de Isaías  sostenía “la posibilidad de un nuevo mundo donde la inteligencia y la tecnología que podía usarse para destruir ahora se convertía en la inteligencia y la tecnología que se usaba para ayudar a Dios a crear el nuevo cielo y la nueva Tierra”.Para hacer esa visión una realidad, Jesús sigue enseñándonos sus caminos, dijo Curry. Cuando él nos enseña sus caminos, no se levantará nación contra nación. Cuando él nos enseña sus caminos, convertiremos las espadas en arados y nuestras lanzas en hoces”, afirmó. “Cuando él enseña sus caminos, aprenderemos el camino de la paz de manera que nuestros soldados no tengan que combatir.Señalando a un niño que dormía en el regazo de su madre, Curry dijo que él estaba describiendo una paz que garantizará que ese niño creciera en un mundo pacífico en el que todo hombre, mujer y niño “fuera tratado conforme a la ley y en todas sus relaciones como un igual hijo de Dios”.– La Rda.  Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora principal y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Tampa, FL Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Press Release Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET center_img Rector Smithfield, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Carl Wright acepta un episcopado que es una ‘paradoja viviente’ El obispo sufragáneo de las Fuerzas Armadas y los ministerios federales asume su papel como ‘soldado de la cruz’ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate Diocese of Nebraska Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Bath, NC Rector Collierville, TN Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Albany, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Press Release Service Submit a Job Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Feb 15, 2017 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Eventslast_img read more

first_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Presiding Bishop’s sermon at opening Eucharist of House of Bishops’ fall 2019 meeting House of Bishops, The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Knoxville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Belleville, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Episcopal Church Office of Public AffairsPosted Sep 18, 2019 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Press Release Service Tags The following is a transcript of Presiding Bishop Michael Curry’s sermon during the opening Eucharist of the House of Bishops meeting on Sept. 17 in Minneapolis, Minnesota.Good morning.Welcome to all bishops and spouses, who are here gathered today and thank you to the Diocese of Minnesota for hosting us.Allow me to interpret one text, actually two, which is not going to be as long as you think. To interpret the epistle and the gospel from the lens of the third text from the Hebrew scripture, from the Epistle from Colossians (3:14, 17)Above all, “Above all, clothe yourselves in love.  And in everything you do, in word and in deed, do it in the name of the Lord Jesus.”Above all, clothe yourselves in love, and in everything you do, do it in the name of the Lord Jesus.And the gospel from John, chapter three.God so loved the world, he gave His only begotten Son to the end that all that believed in Him should not perish but have everlasting life. God so loved the world that He gave Jesus.Now, those are the two texts.I want y’all to mark this moment because I’m preaching from the lectionary. But I have to interpret it. Isaiah, Chapter 51.Listen to me, you that pursue righteousness. You who seek the Lord. Look to the rock from whence you were hewn, and to the quarry from whence you were dug. Look to Abraham, your father and to Sarah, who bore you. And, how bad to ‘ol Hager, who made it right. Look to the rock. That’s what we just sang, this song. And now we’re on the same plain.I had a revelation on the plane. Actually, I didn’t. But he did.The old song says it right.My hope is built on nothing lessThan Jesus’ blood and righteousness. I dare not trust the sweetest frame. But only lean on Jesus’ name On Christ, the solid rock I stand. All other ground is sinking sand.That is a message for the church in all ages. But maybe particularly for us in this time. Look to the rock.Now I’m not going to belabor Isaiah 51 because you all went to seminary. And your spouses probably heard you talk about it.You know that Isaiah 51 comes from the period of the exile and the period after the exile. I’m not sure whether this is Isaiah 2 or Isaiah 3. But it doesn’t matter, it’s in the book. It clearly comes from that time when people who had once known freedom lost it. When the world had been one way one day and became another way the next. When everything that they could count on, everything they could count on in this world, crumbled before their very eyes.In 586 B.C. King Nebuchadnezzar and the armies of Babylon conquered most of the ancient Near East. That included Palestine. They razed the countryside of Palestine, approached the city of Jerusalem, breached the walls of Jerusalem, entered the holy city itself. And then the one institutional reality that they could count on, the temple built by Solomon, Solomon, from the days when the Queen of Sheba came all the way from Ethiopia blew his mind. Now that’s a soap opera . . .The Queen of Sheba and Solomon, that temple, the glorious temple that David had wanted to build but couldn’t build, but Solomon built it, the temple, it stood for the nation, it stood for their faith, it stood for everything they had counted on. And now the temple was destroyed and desecrated.To add insult to injury, took the leading citizens of Jerusalem, that’s why it doesn’t pay to be a leading citizen, took the leading citizens and carted them off to Babylon, a long, long way from home. They sang in their captivity, “Oh by the waters of Babylon, we sat down and wept, when we remember thee, O Zion.As for our harps, we hung them on a lyre as our captors required of us a song, saying sing us one of the songs of Zion. But how?How should we sing the Lord’s song in a strange land? In exile. In exile.As James Weldon Johnson said in “Lift Every Voice and Sing,” these were days when hope unborn had died.And yet, it is precisely in this context that Isaiah speaks, listen to me, you who long for righteousness.  Listen to me, you who long for integrity. Listen to me you who long for justice for the right ordering of God’s world according to God’s dream.  And God said listen to me, you who pursue righteousness. Look to the rock which you were hewn – Look to Abraham! Look to Sarah! Look to Hagar! Look to those who have come before you! But look to the rock that they stood on.And, you’ll figure out how to survive and how to thrive. Even when new parochial reports come out. Look to the rock. Don’t go crazy, I don’t know why everybody goes crazy every year, yeah the numbers are going down. So what? Look to the rock! We’re all followers of Jesus! But I’m getting ahead of myself . . .  Now, I want you to notice Isaiah’s wisdom. (And I promise I’ll finish before the spouses have to leave.  My wife told me to finish before the spouses have to leave.)Isaiah gives them some incredible wisdom. He’s not pining for the good old days. This is not a suggestion we go back, to go back to the 1950s when all the churches were full.No, no, no, this is not pining for the good old days. Go back to the days when America was great so we can make America great again.Help me, somebody? I’m not being political, this is biblical.Isaiah is not pining for the good old days of yesteryear, whatever they happen to be; the golden age of the church or the golden age of America. He’s not pining for the past. He’s summoning up Providence, summoning up principles and values, that are rooted in God, and therefore as immutable.Oh, this isn’t about pining for the past, this is about standing on solid ground that cannot be shaken. Look to the rock. See the truth is, if you put all your apples in this basket called life and existence. They’re going to spoil.You see, life – I don’t know why it’s the way it is all I know it is. You can’t count on very many things in life to stay the same. Take old Heraclitus from ancient Greece. The only thing that doesn’t change is the fact that everything changes. Everything changes. Isaiah, in Chapter 40 says “the grass withers the flower fades, but the word of our God endures forever.” If you bet on the change-able-ness of life and existence – if you still don’t believe me, and I’m not going to do the whole thing – but Frank Sinatra says you can be “riding high in April and shot down in May.” That’s life. Right? That’s life. You don’t believe Frank Sinatra, ask Jesus!Palm Sunday morning was good. It was all right when he was riding on that donkey. Everything was good; even the disciples were having a good time, everybody was having a good time, ‘til the afternoon when he went to temple but that was a whole ‘nother issue. Palm Sunday morning was good. And we call Good Friday, Good Friday. I don’t think Jesus used that phrase. Everything was wonderful. It was Hosanna on Sunday and crucified on Friday. That’s life.(Amen.)Oh, for those of you who are new to this wonderful Episcopal ministry [House of Bishops]. I love it. I wouldn’t change. I wouldn’t give it up and I love it. I’m thankful, I am thankful to be a bishop in this church. I am. I love what I do, but I don’t love everything I have to do. And, the truth is I’ve been in this long enough now. I’m not as old as some of y’all. I’ve been at this long enough to know that there’s some good days, and there’s some other days.I’ve heard hosannas, and I’ve heard crucify.Oh after that consecration, ordination – is Neil Alexander here?  After the ordination, when I was ordained as a new bishop – I see Jeff Lee over there, too – I hope I got that right. Oh, it was wonderful. I say wow, I’m getting the party and I ain’t done nothing. Everything is wonderful. Everybody was so happy to see me and greet me and those first two years were just wonderful and beautiful. This was 2000 and then 2003 came and I thought it was the right thing. I still think – I gave consent for Bishop Robinson to be consecrated and I announced it to the Diocese, and I figured if I told them just you know, just told them the truth, everybody would be okay. Wrong.All of a sudden my Palm Sunday turned to Good Friday very quick. Oh Yeah. Oh yeah. Scott Benhase was in the diocese back then – all hell broke loose. And Michael Curry’s name was mud.But that’s all right. That’s life. That’s the nature of existence. One day one thing, another day is another, but if you follow Jesus, Palm Sunday is real and Good Friday is real, but as the old preacher used to say, “Easter is always coming.” Rebuild this church. Rebuild this country.Rebuild this world on that which is solid, rock solid on Christ. Jesus understood this.You remember that conversation Jesus had with Peter at Caesarea Philippi? Y’all remember that? Please tell me you remember that. They were at Caesarea Philippi, which is kind of a rocky area of Israel, if you go to Israel, it really is. Anyway, it says, Jesus said, “Yo, (he did say yo). Yo, my brothers, tell me, who do people say that I am?” Peter says, “Some say you are Elijah, come back from the dead, because Elijah was supposed to come, you’re Jeremiah, one of the Great Prophets. And everybody was chiming in this and that, this and that.And Jesus said, “Now, who do you say that I am? Who do you say that I am. Peter? Michael? John? Bill? Dave? Jeff? Who do you say that I am? Episcopal Church? Anglican Communion? As Peter said you are the Christ, the Messiah, the Son of the living God . . . And he said now that the Messiah was suffering. Because Love is not selfish.God so loved the world not that he took; that he gave his only begotten Son to suffer and be tried and be convicted unjustly and eventually executed. Peter said No, no, no, no. You can’t. No.This is a Michael midrash for a moment.Between the lines Jesus was saying, no brother, this is the way of love it is unselfish. It is sacrificial. It is a sacrificial way of love that seeks not one’s own self-interest, but the good in the well-being and the welfare of others. That is a way of love that can save you and save this world.He said this is the rock: Me! And this way of love. Y’all thought this Jesus movement and this way of love just like we are talking about, we are talking about the elements of revival for the church. And I believe for the rest of the world that Jesus and his way of love. That’s the rock. That’s the rock on which we can stand and the principle of going back to whatever the rock is, is critical, I believe. And I don’t know what times like and stuff wrong with it. Okay.I believe that this principle of going back to the rock is a principle on which this country; let me speak about this country for a moment, the United States.My brothers, my sisters, my siblings, something’s wrong. Something’s wrong. I believe the words of Langston Hughes, I too sing America.I love this country, this is my home, I ain’t going nowhere. And whatever country you are from, love your country. Love your folks. I’m mindful of the words, I believe it was Thomas Moore, “I may remain the king’s loyal servant, but God’s first.”I love this country, but something’s wrong. Something’s wrong.When folk are out just partying in Dayton, Ohio, and they get gunned down. Something’s wrong. Something’s wrong.You got to read this paper that Tom Breidenthal and the Theology Committee did on white supremacy. We didn’t use this the nice word racism. On the rise of white supremacy.In the 21st century.Something’s wrong when folk are gunned down in El Paso because of the color of their skin and the origin of their home.Something’s wrong with when Jews in Pittsburgh can’t worship the Lord.Something’s wrong when Sikhs can’t worship in Wisconsin in safety.Something’s wrong, in the AME Church in Charleston.Something’s wrong in our cities where drive-bys continue to happen. And innocent children in Chicago are gunned down. And that’s been going on for years throughout the cities of this country.The epidemic of gun violence. Something’s wrong.And something’s wrong when we are not receiving moral leadership. I’m not being partisan now. I don’t care who’s in the White House, Republican, Democrat, Independent. So we need our leaders to call us to the better angels of our nature.  To call us to the values on which this country was founded.Let me tell you something – I’m going to stop in a few –I know full well, that the founders were hypocrites. Because I’m one, too! So are you!  Human beings tend to be hypocritical. That’s why we need Jesus. I know full well that Thomas Jefferson was – his words were one thing, but his life was another. You don’t believe me, ask Mrs. Sally Hemmings or her family.So, I know that, but the truth is even though he was a hypocrite, he was right. His words were right. They are rock, “We hold these truths to be self-evident.”All folk, all children of God are created equal and endowed not by the vote of a congress, not by a parliament, not by any pope, or president. Endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights, among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. That’s rock. That’s what America looks like.Oh, Abe Lincoln, how do you say, four-score and seven years ago, our forefathers came upon these continents, this continent, a new nation conceived in Liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all folk are created equal. That’s America.I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America,and to the Republic for which it stands,one Nation under God, indivisible, indivisible.Indivisible!Not red states and blue states! Indivisible!Not Republican, Independent, Democrat! Indivisible!Not liberal! Indivisible!One nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justiceNot just for some, not just for Americans, not just for people you like, not just for me, not just…  Liberty and justice for all. That’s America.And we must catalyze a revival, a revival in this nation, a revival in our church, a revival to the principles, and to the God who’s the author of them.Three things are going to happen next year. You can pretty much count on it:Parochial statistics are going to be about the same.There’s going to be a presidential election. And the country’s going to be divided, no matter what happens.And we are going to Lambeth. But some of us can’t.  And some of us won’t. And we will each have to make a decision of conscience. And that decision of conscience must be respected. Those of us who go must be witnesses, to our conscience as God is inspiring it, regardless of where you stand. And somehow we must respect others’ decisions and conscience.Now, I’m going to go . . . I’m already all ready. I’m going as witness. I’m going as a witness to the way of love that Jesus has taught me, that I have to love. I believe what I believe because I believe it reflects the way as a way of love.I also believe in the way of love as a way that helps me to understand that some of my brothers and sisters have a different perspective. And love, these, they are my brothers, my sisters.Better yet. In Christ there is no east and west. But one great fellowship of love.In 1963, and with this I will sit down. On September 15 it was the feast of the Holy Cross. And a bomb exploded, Sunday morning, 16th Street Baptist Church. Twenty-two people were wounded and injured.Like in El Paso. Like in America today.Twenty-two people wounded, and four little girls. Addie Mae Collins, Cynthia Wesley, Carole Robertson, and Denise McNair were killed.The bomb killed them. But hatred fired and exploded the bomb. There is hate in our land today.Now there’s hate in our world today.Nativisms have supplanted nationalisms, fascism is on the rise again. The demonic evils that we thought were defeated in the Second World War. The demons have been raised again.We’re in trouble. We’re in trouble.But I got a God. And I will not stake my life on this world. And I will not stake the hope of this world on this world. Because like the old folks used to say, there’s a God who sits on high and looks down low, those old slaves say trouble gonna last always.My brothers, my sisters, my siblings. When we go to Lambeth, no, when we leave this place and begin the rest of this year, and live next year. Look to the rock.In 1963, Dr. King knew how bad Birmingham would be. It’s a different Birmingham today. I got people, family in Birmingham, my folk are from Birmingham. The other side is from North Carolina.The Birmingham today isn’t what it was in 1963. It had a nickname, “Bombingham,” before the bombing. That’s how bad it was.Bull Connor was real. I won’t tell you what church he was a member of. But he was real. And King knew that they were entering hard and dangerous times. And so to prepare the marchers, he gave them a little thing I refer to over time. And after this Eucharist you will get a copy of that. And I hope you keep it in your pocket. To read morning prayer. Or whatever your devotion is. To read what Dr. King said as they were entering into the fray.Remember, the nonviolent movement seeks justice and reconciliation ­– not victory. When we go to Lambeth, remember, walk and talk in the manner of love; for God is love. When you vote, pray daily to be used by God that all men and women might be free. Sacrifice personal wishes that all my truly be free. Observe with friend and foes alike the ordinary rules of human courtesy. Perform regular services for others and for the world. Refrain from the violence of fist, of tongue, of social media, and heart. Strive to be in good bodily and spiritual health.”The pledge began with these words:“As you prepare to march meditate on the life and teachings of Jesus.”Above all hold yourselves in love. Colossians is right.And whatever you do, whatever we do, in word or in deed, do it in the name of the Lord Jesus.My hope is built on nothing lessThan Jesus’ blood and righteousness.I dare not trust the sweetest frameBut wholly on Jesus’ name.On Christ the solid rock I stand.All other ground is sinking sand.God love ya, God bless ya, and may God hold us all, all of us, and this creation, in those almighty hands of love. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Events Rector Bath, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Back to Press Releases Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS House of Bishops Fall 2019 Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Press Release Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Martinsville, VAlast_img read more

first_img Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Anglican Communion, Youth Minister Lorton, VA COVID-19, The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Collierville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Posted Jul 22, 2020 [Church of England] The Church Commissioners have announced they will support England’s cathedral choirs with up to £1 million available to ease the impact of COVID-19.The initiative matches funds from a campaign by The Cathedral Choirs Emergency Fund, which pledged to raise £1 million through fundraising ideas such as a celebrity virtual choral evensong.Following the government’s announcement last week that singing could recommence in specific circumstances, the funding will pay the salaries of lay clerks (adult singers) from September until the end of the year, including the season of Advent and Christmas Day.Read the entire article here. Liturgy & Music Rector Shreveport, LA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Press Release Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Church of England announces £1 million in support for cathedral choirs Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Albany, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Events Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Press Release Servicecenter_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Tags Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Martinsville, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Church of England, Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Bath, NC Submit a Job Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SClast_img read more

first_img Tenita Reid The packet for tonight’s Apopka City Council meeting is only 132 pages long.  And the Agenda is one of the shortest in recent history.  But one never knows what might be presented during the Public Comment Period or the City Council and Mayor’s Reports.Many items look routine, but there are several items that should prompt some interesting discussions and public comment.Here is a guide with links to some of the most interesting items on tonight’s 7:00 PM Apopka City Council Meeting Agenda.ProclamationsOne proclamation on the agenda.  The Apopka High School Bowling Team will be recognized for their most recent accomplishments.  Read this and this if you have not been following the team closely.June Disbursement ReportThe first of five items on the “Consent Agenda” is approval of the 44-page Apopka July 2016 Disbursement Report that lists 549 checks that were issued by the City during July 2016.  These payments total $2,923,393.A few payments that caught our attention include:Page 5 – Florida Transportation Systems – Bluebird Bus for Recreation Program & Events – $117,305Page 8 – Public Risk Management of Florida – Group BO 0727 July 2016 – $321,010Page 18 – Public Risk Management of Florida – 4TH QTR 15/16 Property Coverage – $93,280Page 40 – Otto Environmental Systems – 712 65-gallon carts – $34,436The “Consent Agenda” is a meeting practice which packages routine and non-controversial items not requiring discussion and/or separate approval as one agenda item.  However, any member of the Council can request that any item on the Consent Agenda be “pulled,” and discussed separately.An Evening with the ArtistsOn September 15th there will be an evening reception at Apopka City Hall. An Evening with the Artist will recognize the artists that have contributed to the beautification of City Hall over the past year.  The public will be invited to hear and see what inspired these artists.The event will include presentations from each invited artist on their favorite art piece and will also include complimentary wine, cheese, and light hors d’oeuvres. Wine will be distributed via a ticket system upon arrival, each adult will receive two tickets redeemable for two glasses of wine during the event. Commitments have been obtained from local sponsors to cover the cost of the event.Apopka Ordinance No. 2376 requires City Council approval for the sale, consumption and carrying of alcoholic beverages on City-owned property during events or programs.Community Redevelopment Agency AppointmentIn June the City Council unanimously approved the appointment of Pat McGuffin to serve on the CRA. Mr. McGuffin advised the City that he would decline the CRA appointment. MayorKilsheimer is recommending the Council appoint Chenicqua T. Williams to the CRA.Scoreboard sponsorship from The John Land Apopka Community TrustIn June the City Council approved the purchase a new football scoreboard for the Northwest Recreation complex at a cost of $11,860.10. To help offset the cost the City Council alsoapproved a $5,100.00 sponsorship from Modern Orthodontics. The John Land Apopka Community Trust would like to donate $4,000 towards the remaining cost.The meeting is at 7:00 PM in the Council Chamber at Apopka City Hall. TAGSApopka City Council Meeting Previous articleNelson thanks Back to School Fair sponsors and volunteersNext articleCommunity Groups to Recognize Apopka’s First Responders Dale Fenwick RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR I meant to say, I fully understand how they will get away with the alcohol drinking………I left out a word in the above posting. It is interesting to sit back and watch the power struggles unfold of the ones who want power, and don’t have it. It makes for good spectator sport, at the council meetings, but also at the same time gets old quick. August 18, 2016 at 10:50 am Tenita Reid August 18, 2016 at 9:14 am Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Tenita Reid Tenita Reid Please enter your name here City Council Review, as I am back home, now. Lots of public comments. Mine toward the end. The council didn’t listen. I didn’t expect them to. Commissioner Bankson did question a lot about the legalities of drinking wine at city hall and addressed my concerns by questioning the lawyer, and discussing it with the mayor. Thank you Commissioner Bankson for that, at least. The other council members were not concerned, with my concerns. Commissioner Velazquez said that the city has alcohol at the VFW, and I said yes, but not city hall. The lawyer said he has been to courthouses and had been served alcohol. The lawyer swayed their opinions, that it was okay to drink alcohol at city hall. They all voted to approve the consent agenda. So the booze will flow Sept. 15, 2016 and the drinking of alcohol will be allowed at city hall premises! Unbelievable to me, and another person, who shall remain unnamed, said it was unbelievable to them also. Now I was told my time was up by the mayor, during the public comment time. I had timed my speech on my stopwatch on my phone, and every time it was below 4 minutes, I checked. I know darn well it was only a few seconds over at the most, and the mayor called me out on it. They must of started the clock early. Others went on and on and on and on, and argued and argued. Check it out when they put the audio on the agenda of Apopka.net. I am getting tired of get the hook, so to speak. There has been times in the past, I was even told my four minutes was approaching! Good grief. This is getting like the gong show, and I am getting the gong, and I have not spoken out about anything at the council since April when the new council members got elected.“: Tenita, I listened to your speech at the city council meeting, and I agree with you 100% that city hall should not be turned into a glorified bar. Those in authority now days are blurring the line on what is right and what is wrong. I appreciate you standing up for the morals in our city, and recognizing that buzz driving is drunk driving. You make MADD mothers proud! Take care, and thumbs up for caring about our city! LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Tenita Reid I see the photo posted on Apopka Then and Now website, of Apopka Mayor Edward J. Ryan with his two sisters in 1904 at the World’s Fair in St. Louis……very nice! I’m sure, that you, as his relative, who posted the photo, that makes you so very proud! Also it is interesting that Mayor Kilsheimer is a St. Louis Cardinal fan. Is that old photo on metal? It looks like it is…… I have some old photos that have been passed down, and they are on metal. Just curious, if you happen to see this, I would like to know. Tenita Reid Tenita Reid 11 COMMENTS Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 I left early because the other public speakers just wore me down with their carrying on, and I was getting tired and sleepy. I think I kind of like the public comments at the beginning after all! Reply August 18, 2016 at 9:51 am Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter August 17, 2016 at 10:18 pm Reply Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. August 17, 2016 at 10:15 pmcenter_img I am thinking about last night’s council meeting and how it went and I am telling you, truthfully if I were the mayor last night, I would have had a few of those citizens escorted out the door, as they really pushed the limits regarding the public comment portion! Maybe the mayor needs to follow former Mayor John Land’s lead, and wham the gavel, and if that doesn’t work, then have them escorted out, as they clearly knew they were pushing the limit regarding the public comment section. If I were the mayor up there, I would wham the gavel, and oops….the handle flew off, sorry about that!!!! LOL!!! Reply Tenita Reid The Anatomy of Fear August 17, 2016 at 9:54 pm August 18, 2016 at 2:02 pm The one lady from the Apopka Art and Foliage Festival who spoke at the podium at last night’s council meeting, sorry I can’t remember her name, she talked about how they started the festival way back then, and that it started as the Apopka Folk Festival, is what I believe she said, I may have heard it wrong, but that they had to deal with the sandspurs, the sand, and all of that in the beginning. I don’t go back that far, but I do remember in 1970, when I lived right there, near the park, that the park was not nearly as nice as now, as the lawn was sparse, and had mostly sugar sand, and there were sandspurs, but they did have way more shade and oak trees. I walk through the park all the time now days, and I think they need to plant more oaks to replenish the big oaks that have been lost to the winds, and lightning. It is somewhat hot in there when April comes around for the Apopka Art and Foliage Festival, with not near as much shade. The ornamental trees are nice, but they need more shade! Apopka Art and Foliage ladies are doing a great job……you all rock! August 18, 2016 at 8:23 am You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here August 17, 2016 at 10:08 pm Tenita Reid Please enter your comment! Reply Reply August 18, 2016 at 8:15 am Tenita Reid Maybe the Apopka City Council will approve of, and let the public have some free wine during the future council meetings……..whoopee,wheeeee…..it would certainly make the council meetings more tolerable…… cheese, wine, vittles, and in- house fighting, what more could a citizen ask for? Bring on the Mad Dog 20/20, I will just have to go with the flow, and have to disregard the disrespect aspect of drinking booze at city hall, and get used to the “change”. Reply I fully understand how they will away with the alcohol drinking at city hall …..because it is being given away, instead of sold. That is the loophole, apparently. Isn’t that amazing? Mama Mia Reply Reply I am being serious now and all jokes aside, it is my opinion that allowing alcohol to be served at city hall is disrespectful, wrong, and is crossing the line. Mayor Land used to speak about the dark side of alcohol, and there is no denying he knew what he was talking about. He caught a lot of heat about alcohol restrictions under his administration, in the media, but he was right, regarding the subject of the dark side of alcohol. I had my say, and that is all I can do, as a citizen of this town. It may not be illegal, and other cities may do it, but is it right? I don’t think so, at city hall. There will be some who will bring their kids along to the art event at city hall, don’t think they won’t, and mama or daddy may drive home under the influence, just saying…………… Reply Reply August 18, 2016 at 8:39 am Reply last_img read more

first_img Rare Country presented its first Humanitarian Award to country music legend, Charlie Daniels last weekend. According to Rare Country, “This award honors Charlie as he has graciously given his time and support towards uplifting the human spirit through his work assisting veterans via his organization, Journey Home Project.”A sell-out event, the Charlie Daniels 80th Birthday Volunteer Jam hit a capacity of 15,784 patrons at Bridgestone Arena November 30th. It was a star-studded show and a portion of the proceeds benefitting The Journey Home Project. The event featured guests 3 Doors Down, Luke Bryan, Kid Rock, Larry The Cable Guy, Chris Stapleton and Travis Tritt with the Charlie Daniels Band for another historic jam. The jam featured a variety of the artists singing standards like “Can’t You See” and “Will the Circle Be Unbroken.”Charlie Daniels was surprised with the Rare Country Humanitarian of the Year Award by Randy Travis and Lt. General Keith Huber before playing his mega-hit “The Devil Went Down to Georgia” to the sold out crowd.“Looking back over my 50 plus year career, this is among the top five shows I have ever done in my entire life, Volunteer Jam 2016,” said Charlie Daniels of the momentous occasion.Since 1974, Daniels has commissioned his musical friends and peers to come together on a “volunteer” basis to hang out, “jam” together, and entertain crowds in an unconventional, laid-back fashion unknown to any other concert event — all while dedicating concert proceeds to worthy causes. This year’s event featured extra special “jam” sessions with some of Charlie’s most prolific friends who celebrated the Country Music Hall of Famer, his birthday, and his many accomplishments.See what Luke Bryan had to say backstage just before the Volunteer Jam started.A portion of the proceeds from the night went to  The Journey Home Project, a 501(c)(3) non-profit co-founded by Daniels and manager, David Corlew, to help Veterans of the United States Armed Forces. For more info on The Journey Home Project, please visit thejourneyhomeproject.org. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. TAGSCharlie Daniels Previous articleOrlando puts moratorium on marijuanaNext articleSoccer tournament coming to Apopka Dale Fenwick RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Please enter your comment! Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here The Anatomy of Fear Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Please enter your name herelast_img read more