first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The Scarlets have been working hard behind the scenes over the past three months to secure the services of a number of key players within their squad for next season and beyond and will make announcements on all the region’s contract extensions and signings in due course.Nigel Davies added: “I am very comfortable with what we have achieved in terms of securing the talents of our core Scarlets players going forward. This group has progressed significantly over the past 18 months and we will continue our investment in developing Welsh talent from within our region – that is key to our philosophy and values and our future direction as a rugby business. “We expect to make these announcements post Six Nations when our whole group is back together within our environment here at Parc y Scarlets.” The Scarlets have confirmed that 30 year-old centre Regan King will leave the region at the end of his contract this summer after six seasons in Llanelli. The once-capped All Black has been a valued member of the Scarlets squad for the past six years and more recently has played an important role in helping advance the development of the Scarlets own fast-emerging backs talent – including international centre Jon Davies this season’s star performer Gareth Maule.King will join French champions and Top 14 giants Clermont Auvergne next season on a new three-year contract. He joined the Scarlets in May 2005.Known for his superb handling skills, agility and finesse on the field, Regan King returned to form this season after being absent in the 2008/2009 and 2009/2010 seasons after picking up a career threatening hamstring injury in February 2009 which kept him off the field for a year. Scarlets Head Coach Nigel Davies said: “Regan has been a great asset within our rugby set-up for many years now and as a player has skills and qualities which you just don’t find everywhere. He’s a true rugby talent and it’s been great to see him come back strongly this season. His contribution and experience as one of our senior players has been particularly significant in recent seasons – our backs have without doubt benefited from playing and training alongside him, appreciating the quality he brings to the game and learning from his great skills, timing and ability with the ball.”“Regan’s contract with us concluded this summer and he goes with our best wishes to France where at this stage in his career he’ll have some great opportunities. The French clubs are staking a major claim for some of the top players in Europe at this time and evidently have the budgets and resources to do so. We’re very grateful to Regan for his contribution over the past six seasons and wish him and his family well in France.”King, who was born in Christchurch, New Zealand and has a British father, achieved his All Blacks cap against Wales at the Millennium Stadium in November 2002. He was previously with Stade Francais before leaving after six months to join the Scarlets in the 2005/2006 season. He has appeared 135 times for the region and scored 185 points. This season King has appeared 19 times and scored four tries. Regan King said: “I’d like to thank everyone at the Scarlets, the coaching team, the players and all the supporters for a great six years. It’s been a massive honour to be part of this great club, with its history and spirit. My family has always been made to feel really at home here and we’ve enjoyed our time in Llanelli – we’ve made great friends and our children were born here so it will always be a special place for us. “You’ve got to admire the work being done by the Scarlets to develop great new rugby players from within this region and from what I’ve seen, it will be a good thing for the Scarlets future.“It’s been a tough decision to leave as I’ve got a real bond and affinity with the Scarlets and all the boys here as I’ve been here quite a while. They’re a really good bunch of players, it’s a great atmosphere in the group. It’s been a pleasure to train and play alongside them and see some of the younger guys coming through so well now and many of them getting international caps.”“At this stage in my career, the offer from France was one that was right for me and my family and I felt that it’s probably time to move on. I’m grateful to everyone associated with the Scarlets and I’ll go with great memories of both Stradey Park and Parc y Scarlets.” TAGS: Scarlets last_img read more

first_img–       Scotland conceded ten penalties in the first half compared to Italy’s two. Three of those were against Moray Low in the scrum. He was replaced by Geoff Cross on the 38 minute.–      Referee Steve Walsh gave 16 penalties in total, but did not brandish a yellow card once. He did go to the TMO a few times to check for tries.–      Duncan Weir on his drop goal: “It’s all a big blur to be honest. We had a few chances to go for it. I was in the pocket and Cus (Chris Cusiter) gave me a lovely ball and the rest is history.”–      Asked if he wanted to comment on the pressure on him, Scott Johnson said: “Not really.” But he did say that the last few weeks’ criticism was deserved and that this week, the team handled pressure better in the second half, which led to the points and that Scotland were the better team. “I was delighted for Duncan (Weir)” he added.Burn, Baby Burn: Try scorer Josh FurnoWhat’s next?–       Scotland have the monkey off the back after winning and have a week off, however, with France coming to Murrayfield many fans will be hoping that the Scots carry on their calm, sedate, joke-free preparation from this week into the next game.–       Italy have taken up the ‘brave losers’ tag. Their forwards deserved better and Tommaso Allan guided the game well, but they have now lost to Scotland in their last three meetings, in three different countries.RW’s proposed Italy XV v Ireland: Luke McLean, Angelo Esposito, Michael Campagnaro, Gonzalo Garcia, Leonardo Sarto, Tommaso Allan, Edoardo Gori, Alberto de Marchi, Leonardo Ghiraldini, Martin Castrogiovanni, Quintin Geldenhuys, Joshua Furno, Alessandro Zanni, Robert Barbieri, Sergio ParisseWhy shake things up? They aren’t going to get magically better if there are a few changes. There are a some hard-working, powerful men in that pack and if guys like Michael Campagnaro or Leonardo Sarto are to profit from this they need time together. Tommaso Allan is their long-term leader, too. He has grown a lot since playing for Scotland U20. Italy’s lock Joshua Furno (C) celebrates after scoring a try during the Six Nations International rugby union match between Italy and Scotland on February 22, 2014 at the Olympic stadium in Rome. AFP PHOTO / ANDREAS SOLARO (Photo credit should read ANDREAS SOLARO/AFP/Getty Images) Monkey off the back: The Scotland boys celebrate their tight but enthralling victory over Italy at the Stadio OlimpicoBy Alan Dymock at Stadio OlimpicoThe match in 30 secondsThe man for the moment: Duncan WeirDuncan Weir’s inch perfect drop-kick was enough to see defeat Italy 21-20 right at the death of a pulsating Six Nations fixture in Rome.The game ended with two tries for each team, with Alex Dunbar grabbing two for Scotland and Tommaso Allan and Josh Furno sweeping to powerful team tries for the hosts. However, it was the ballsy finish from Weir will have relieved many, as early in the second half captain Greig Laidlaw spurned an easy penalty kick to tap and go – to no avail.The second half, in particular was a breath-taking display, highlighting the merits of having both these teams in the Six Nations.Italy – Tries: Allan, Furno. Con: Allan, Orquera. Pens: Allan 2.Scotland –Tries: Dunbar 2  Con: Weir. Pens: Laidlaw 2. DG: Weir.Post-match bulletin–      After the match Jacques Brunel bemoaned Italy’s inability to convert their good performances from the last few matches and he felt Italy played well – they just didn’t get there.–       Scotland’s centres beat defenders nine times between them – including Dunbar’s two tries – while Stuart Hogg beat three defenders. For Italy, Allan, Furno and skipper Sergio Parisse all made clean breaks.–       Scotland won all of their own lineouts – a stark contrast to the last few games – and stole two of Italy’s. However, the hosts will wonder how they lost with a tackle success rate of 90%, a scrum success rate of 90% on their own ball and a lot of pressure at the breakdown. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS RW’s proposed Scotland XV v France: Stuart Hogg, Tommy Seymour, Alex Dunbar, Matt Scott, Sean Lamont, Duncan Weir, Chris Cusiter; Ryan Grant, Scott Lawson, Geoff Cross, Richie Gray, Jim Hamilton, Johnnie Beattie, Chris Fusaro, David DentonA win’s a win and all that, but Scotland still persisted in making poor substitutions at the wrong time. If you want back-row balance, keep Beattie, bring in Denton and have a scavenger (if you don’t want Kelly Brown, as they don’t seem to, keep Fusaro). And if you have the mantra of picking on for, keep Scott Lawson and drop Moray Low for the less mobile but tighter Geoff Cross. Because France come to scrum.last_img read more

first_img138 – Metres made by Mike Brown, more than any other player. George North made 109 for Wales.16 – Tackles made by Dan Lydiate, more than any other player. Maro Itoje was England’s top tackler with 14.25 – Tackles missed by Wales compared to 18 by England.18 – Number of ball-carries made by Billy Vunipola, more than any other player.England: M Brown; A Watson, J Joseph (E Daly 75), O Farrell, J Nowell; G Ford (M Tuilagi 64), B Youngs (D Care 64); J Marler (M Vunipola 57), D Hartley (capt, L Cowan-Dickie 72), D Cole, M Itoje, G Kruis (J Launchbury 79), C Robshaw (K Brookes 72), J Haskell (J Clifford 69), B Vunipola.Try: Watson. Con: Farrell. Pens: Farrell 6.Yellow card: Cole (72min)Wales: L Williams; A Cuthbert, J Davies, J Roberts, G North; D Biggar (R Priestland 74), G Davies (R Webb 64); R Evans (P James 53), S Baldwin (K Owens 53), S Lee (T Francis 53), B Davies, AW Jones (L Charteris 64), D Lydiate, S Warburton (capt, J Tipuric 57), T Faletau.Tries: Biggar, North, Faletau. Con: Biggar, Priestland 2.Referee: Craig Joubert (South Africa)Man of the Match: Maro Itoje Crowning glory: Dylan Hartley and England celebrate with the Triple Crown. Photo: Getty Images LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: Highlight Attendance: 81,916For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. England picked up their first piece of silverware of the Eddie Jones era, beating Wales at Twickenham to secure the Triple Crown. Dylan Hartley’s side bossed the first half, continually showing pace and sharpness in attack, to build a 16-0 lead at the break. Owen Farrell was faultless from the tee, slotting 20 points in all, while Anthony Watson added another try to his Test haul. England were hugely impressive for 65minutes, but Wales made it a nervous finish for the hosts. They ran in two tries in the last six minutes and George North got close to getting another before being put into touch by Manu Tuilagi. So Wales outscored England three tries to one, but England held on to win the game and they head to Paris next week with a chance of winning a first Six Nations Grand Slam since 2003.WHAT’S HOT…Maro Itoje – The Saracens lock was superb, making a mockery of anybody who had suggested he wasn’t ready to play at Test level. He may only be 21 but he was the leading figure on the pitch at Twickenham. By half-time alone he had stolen two lineouts – not to mention the numerous ones he’d won on England’s throw – won a crucial turnover ten metres from the line seconds after stopping Gareth Davies as Wales mounted their one decent attack of the first 40 minutes and set up the try.Star man: Man of the Match Maro Itoje stole two lineouts against Wales. Photo: Getty ImagesFor Anthony Watson’s touchdown, first he won the lineout, supplying quick ball off the top, then he popped up on the opposite side of the pitch, broke the Wales line, passed to Mike Brown, who then fed Watson the scoring pass. Eddie Jones called him a Vauxhall Viva earlier in the tournament but said afterwards: “He’s a BMW now!” He was a worthy winner of Man of the Match and has a big future.Wales’ spirit – At 19-0 down early in the second half and 25-7 down well into the last ten minutes, Wales looked completely out of this game. Yet, they came back extremely well in the last 15 minutes. Playing with more adventure and at a higher tempo, they caused England problems, especially when Dan Cole was sent to the sin-bin. Dan Biggar had got Wales on the scoreboard with a try after charging down a George Ford kick, but it was the two tries in two minutes late in the game from George North and Taulupe Faletau, both well-worked, that had England fans biting their nails. England weathered the storm but the frailty shown in the last ten minutes will be a worry for Eddie Jones heading to France. In fairness, though, it’s likely to be his only worry after such an impressive performance.Decent touch: Dan Biggar scores after charging down a George Ford kick. Photo: Getty ImagesThe weather – Okay, it was hardly like being in the Caribbean but the sun was shining as the game kicked off at Twickenham and the conditions were perfect for a game of rugby.Respectful crowd – There was little, if any, whistling for goalkicks and the entire stadium applauded when Wales captain Sam Warburton was taken off on a stretcher. No one wants to see players suffer injuries, but it’s good to see such respect shown by supporters of both teams.Thanks: Sam Warburton gestures to the crowd as he’s taken off. Photo: Getty ImagesWHAT’S NOT…Sluggish starts – In Dublin in Wales’ opening game of the Six Nations they allowed Ireland to build a 13-0 lead. Yes, they fought back to draw 16-16 but that slow start cost them. At Twickenham their start was even worse. They fell off tackles (19 missed in the first 40!), gave away far too many penalties and allowed England to dominate territory and possession. By half-time the home side had built a 16-0 lead but England could have had more points, Ben Youngs knocking on as he tried to touch down and Dan Cole failing to ground the ball. Wales scrambled well at times but their usually solid defence looked shaky given the pace England were playing at and they lacked ideas in attack.First act: Anthony Watson scores England’s first-half try. Photo: Getty ImagesThey came back to score those three tries in the second half and looked the more dangerous team in the last 20 minutes, especially when England were down to 14, but it was all too late. As Warren Gatland said they looked flat in the first half. They need to stop these slow starts, especially with a tour to New Zealand coming in June.Billy’s bursts – One thing Wales did manage to do well was stop Billy Vunipola. England’s No 8 has been one of the stars of this year’s championship, but his usually strong charges were cut short here as Wales put two or three defenders on him, limiting his impact.Closed down: Billy Vunipola was marshalled well by Wales’ defence. Photo: Getty ImagesTMO delays – It’s been a common gripe ever since the start of the World Cup. Things have improved recently – Wayne Barnes, in particular, showing how to perfectly use the technology while play continues – but they took a backward turn here. The fact Craig Joubert went to the TMO within two minutes after England pressurised Wales’ line and the consultation lasted longer than the match had at that point didn’t help, nor did several further referrals during the match. Everyone wants the right decision but there must be a way to make these delays shorter.One thing the TMO did flag was Tomas Francis making contact with Dan Cole’s face. There was only one angle so it couldn’t be determined whether it was deliberate and it resulted in only an England penalty at the time, but the Wales prop will have a nervous wait to see what the citing commissioner decides.On target: Owen Farrell slotted 20 points for England. Photo: Getty ImagesSTATISTICS A round-up of what’s hot and what’s not from the England-Wales showdown at Twickenhamlast_img read more

first_img Italy points difference at -101 after three rounds of Six NationsAfter just three rounds of the 2021 Six Nations, Italy sit rock bottom of the table with a terrifying points difference of -101. Italy lost 48-10 to Ireland in Rome in the third round, conceding six tries in the process.Italy lost in the first round against France 50-10 and in the second round to England, 41-18. The latest loss, to Ireland at home, means that Italy have now lost 30 Six Nations matches in a row.Related: Social media reacts to the Iain Hederson try that wasn’t against ItalyBack in 2017, Italy finished their Six Nations campaign with a dismal points difference of -151. Could they finish this season’s run with a worse points difference?In the last two rounds of the 2021 Six Nations, Italy will face Wales in Rome and then in their last clash of the campaign they will face Scotland at Murrayfield (where the Azzurri last won a Six Nations match, all the way back in 2015). Also make sure you know about the Fixtures, Injuries, Table, Venues, TV Coverage by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram The Azzurri lose heavily again, against Ireland LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS According to Russ Petty, who has a keen eye for key rugby statistics, Wales’ last five Six Nations wins away to Italy finished with a positive points difference for the men in red, at +8, +17, +41, +26 and +11.Petty also says that Scotland’s last five home wins against Italy (and remember, this does not include the home loss to the Azzurri in 2015) had points differences of +20, +13, +24, +29 and +13.So bearing all of that in mind, could Italy finish this championship with a slightly better points difference than the 2017 nadir, or could they cough up even more points? Follow our Six Nations homepage which we update regularly with news and features. Jacopo Trulla of Italy during the loss to Ireland (Getty Images) last_img read more

first_img Renewing battle: Scotland and France in action during their previous clash last autumn (AFP/Getty) What have the coaches said?Scotland head coach Gregor Townsend: “We feel we’re capable of going there and getting a result. We need to win by a few points (five) to get to third and potentially get to second (eight). But that’s what we’re gunning towards.“We’ve shown that we can play very well away from home and if we do deliver an 80-minute performance we’ll be more than just competitive. What are the line-ups?France: Brice Dulin; Damian Penaud, Virimi Vakatawa, Arthur Vincent, Gaël Fickou; Romain Ntamack, Antoine Dupont; Cyril Baille, Julien Marchand, Mohamed Haouas, Bernard Le Roux, Swan Rebbadj, Anthony Jelonch, Charles Ollivon (capt), Gregory Alldritt.Replacements: 16 Camille Chat, 17 Jean-Baptiste Gros, 18 Uini Atonio, 19 Romain Taofifenua, 20 Dylan Cretin, 21 Baptiste Serin, 22 Anthony Bouthier, 23 Teddy Thomas.Scotland: Stuart Hogg (capt); Darcy Graham, Chris Harris, Sam Johnson, Duhan van der Merwe; Finn Russell, Ali Price; Rory Sutherland, George Turner, Zander Fagerson, Sam Skinner, Grant Gilchrist, Jamie Ritchie, Hamish Watson, Nick Haining.Replacements: 16 Dave Cherry, 17 Oli Kebble, 18 Simon Berghan, 19 Alex Craig, 20 Ryan Wilson, 21 Scott Steele, 22 Adam Hastings, 23 Huw Jones. “We’ve played France a couple of times in the last 12 months, they’ve been close games. We didn’t fire many shots against them in November, but it was right down to the last minute.“We hadn’t won in London in 38 years and hadn’t won in Wales in 18 years. Our players can take a lot of confidence from those two performances. This is an opportunity more than any other when there’s no crowd in the stadium.”On the late call-up for Ryan Wilson: “We were able to call on Ryan at short notice given Glasgow Warriors had already conducted two Covid tests this week, which meant he was safe to travel and join up with the squad. Given Ryan’s Test-match experience and his form this season, we believe he will grab his opportunity on his return to the squad.”Scotland defence coach Steve Tandy: “A win would be huge. We’ve been knocking off little bits of history, like winning in Wales and at Twickenham, so this would be another step in the right direction for the group.”Scotland captain Stuart Hogg: “A lot has been said that’s beginning to hack me off. The fact they’ve got to get 21 points. We read a quote from one of their players (Charles Ollivon) saying that they’ve got a trophy to win. As a proud Scotsman, that hurt me a lot.“The ongoing thing is that a lot of stuff is written about us that often concentrates on opposition rather than ourselves. We will let our rugby do the talking.“We win by eight points, and we finish the highest we’ve ever finished in a Six Nations. That’s the motivation for us. It’s going to be one hell of a challenge, an open game of rugby, and we’re really, really excited for it.” TAGS: Highlight What of the prospects? The smart money, you feel, is on a French win but not on the necessary scale to deny Wales the title. Les Bleus can be formidable when they get a head of steam up but Scotland are made of sterner stuff these days. They don’t look like a side that are about to roll over.That was very much the case in last year’s Six Nations, when Scotland ended France’s Grand Slam bid with a 28-17 win at Murrayfield. Maitland scored two of their tries that day in a match skewed by a first-half red card for Mohamed Haouas for punching Ritchie.The countries met at the same venue in the Autumn Nations Cup, France winning 22-15 to secure their first success in Edinburgh since 2014.Heated: Mohamed Haouas grapples with Jamie Ritchie before throwing his infamous punch (Getty)What’s the big team news?With a short turnaround, both sides ring the changes. Fly-half Matthieu Jalibert incurred a head injury last week and is replaced by Romain Ntamack, who came on against Wales. Ntamack was the top scorer in last year’s championship.Paul Willemse begins a two-match ban after being sent off for making contact with the eye of Welsh prop Wyn Jones. With fellow lock Romain Taofifenua dropping to the bench, Bernard Le Roux and Toulon’s Swan Rebbadj – making his first Test start – comprise the engine room.Flanker Anthony Jelonch and centre Arthur Vincent are also recalled, in place of Dylan Cretin and wing Teddy Thomas. Gaël Fickou moves from inside-centre to the wing to accommodate Vincent, while Damian Penaud switches flanks.DID YOU KNOW? Tonight’s victors will take possession of the Auld Alliance Trophy, which commemorates the 22 French and 30 Scottish internationals killed during the First World War. It was created in 2018 by trophy makers Thomas Lyte  Scotland were forced to make a change to their selected side as No 8 Matt Fagerson dropped out after sustaining an ankle injury in training on Wednesday. Nick Haining comes into the XV and Ryan Wilson joins the bench.That and Maitland’s absence are just two of the rejigs for Scotland. Like France, they welcome back a star No 10, Finn Russell returning following his concussion against Ireland in round four. Skipper Hogg returns to full-back having stood in at ten against Italy.Scrum-half Price, centre Harris and hooker George Turner all return to the starting XV. Scott Steele, Huw Jones and Dave Cherry – who scored a double against the Azzurri – must settle for replacement roles. Alongside them will be Adam Hastings, involved for the first time this year following injury and suspension. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Any interesting statistics?France have won 17 of their 21 Six Nations matches against Scotland. All four defeats have been away from home, in 2006, 2016, 2018 and 2020The two scrum-halves for this match, Antoine Dupont and Ali Price, have the most try assists in the tournament, with four and three respectivelyFrance’s penchant for offloading is clear: Dupont (seven), Gregory Alldritt and Julien Marchand (both five) lead the way in the championship, alongside Stuart Hogg (six)Duhan van der Merwe and Dupont both need one try to tie with Anthony Watson and Louis Rees-Zammit as top try-scorer (on four). Or two to take that accolade outrightVan der Merwe has made 29 tackle breaks in the tournament – a dozen more than the next-best in the list, Hogg and Brice DulinBleus captain Charles Ollivon has the most lineout wins, with 18Ryan Wilson will win his 50th Scotland cap if summoned from the replacements benchScotland have had more possession (59%) than any other side in this Six Nations. France (45%) have had the lowest share of possessionScotland have the best tackle success rate (93%), ahead of second-best France (89%) Six Nations France v Scotland PreviewSo, we arrive at the climax to this madcap Guinness Six Nations championship. France and Scotland were meant to have met in late February but now bring the curtain down on a tournament with a galaxy of twists and turns.Let’s start with the maths. France’s last-gasp win against Wales last weekend means they can clinch their first Six Nations title since 2010. To do that, they must beat Scotland by at least 21 points and score at least four tries. Or, in a similar but far less likely scenario, they must win by 20 points and score at least six tries.Failure to do either would give Wales the championship that they came so agonisingly close to securing at Stade de France last Saturday night.Double hit: Antoine Dupont is collared by two Welshmen during France’s win last Saturday (Getty)Scotland have no title to play for but could finish runners-up for the first time since the tournament was expanded to six teams in 2000. That is quite an incentive. To achieve that, they must overcome a Paris hoodoo because it’s 22 years since they won in the French capital.Who can forget that astonishing spring day in 1999 when Scotland scored five tries in 27 first-half minutes? Wales’ defeat of England the next day gave the Scots the last-ever Five Nations title. Two decades on, all of Wales is hoping Scotland will return the favour.What do Scotland require to get second place? To win with a try bonus point while restricting France to one bonus point. Or to win by at least eight points whilst denying France a bean.Further motivation for the Scots comes in the shape of Lions squad places, in the week that the Lions board announced their intention to fulfil the existing tour schedule.Related content: Lions commit to South Africa tourIf Stuart Hogg is arguably the only Scot 100% nailed on to be picked by Warren Gatland, there are a host of others in the ’near certainty’ or ‘decent shout’ bracket. Hamish Watson and Finn Russell are obvious ones, but what of Rory Sutherland, Ali Price, Jamie Ritchie, Chris Harris, Huw Jones and Duhan van der Merwe? We could go on.Leap year: Chris Harris jumps over an Italian defender whilst supporting Huw Jones last weekend (Getty)Further subplots. Because this game, postponed from February due to a Covid outbreak in the French camp, falls outside the international window, Gregor Townsend can only select five English-based players. Thus, Saracens’ Sean Maitland, a 53-cap regular, misses out, along with a string of squad players. Exeter’s Jonny Gray wasn’t available because of a hand injury.Townsend declared himself satisfied with the arrangement, mainly because he had feared he would have no English-based players at all. Not everyone is quite so content, as this tweet from former Scotland captain Andy Nicol shows… Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. France are gunning for the title, Scotland for second spot. And Wales could be left with the broadest smile. What a cracking finale to the 2021 Six Nations in Paris tonight World class: Scotland captain Stuart Hogg has once again had an outstanding championship (Inpho)What time does it kick off and is it on TV?France v Scotland, Friday 26 March, Stade de FranceThis concluding match of the championship kicks off at 8pm (GMT) in Paris and is live on BBC. Or listen on BBC Radio 5 Live, BBC Sounds or BBC Radio ScotlandEngland’s Wayne Barnes is the referee, assisted by the RFU’s Tom Foley as TMO. Barnes refereed the sides’ Autumn Nations Cup game in November and was an assistant ref during last year’s Six Nations meeting.The men with the flag this time are Matthew Carley (RFU) and Andrea Piardi (Italy).last_img read more

first_imgMastercard has long been involved in rugby but has dismissed suggestions this partnership has been tacked onto deals in the men’s game, insisting the company is committed to investing in women’s sport.Raja Rajamannar, Mastercard chief marketing and communications officer, said: “This is definitely not an add-on, nor is it something being done for political correctness.“We believe in this cause. We’re investing a humongous amount of money, effort, time behind women’s sports, behind women’s athletes, behind women’s musicians. It’s a company-wide priority and it’s a philosophy we’re trying to bring to life by walking the talk.”World Rugby Women’s Rugby general manager Katie Sadleir added: “We are thrilled to welcome Mastercard on board as our founding partner of Women in Rugby. A core pillar of our ambitious women’s strategic plan is to develop a strong and engaged portfolio of strategic commercial partners committed to long-term investment and support for the women’s game.“I am also very excited by our new Team Powered marketing campaign, which encompasses all the incredible features of women’s rugby and will help us to build on the huge growing number of females involved in our sport in recent years.” Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. World Rugby has launched a new marketing campaign entitled Team Powered LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Watch: New Women in Rugby campaign‘Team Powered’ is the theme of the new Women in Rugby campaign launched by World Rugby today.Women’s rugby is already a growth area for the game – 2.7m women and girls play worldwide – and the aim of this campaign is to continue that growth by showcasing rugby as the ultimate team sport.World Rugby chief executive Alan Gilpin said: “Team Powered showcases the unique values, diversity and inclusivity of women’s rugby and will encourage more women and girls to get involved in the sport, on and off the pitch.”The promotional video features France scrum-half Pauline Bourdon, England prop Shaunagh Brown, Japan centre Ayaka Suzuki and USA lock Alycia Washington as well as New Zealand clubs Ponsonby and College Rifles.Watch the new Women in Rugby campaign here…World Rugby has also announced Mastercard as the founding global partner of its Women in Rugby programme. Mastercard are also the first worldwide partner of the 2021 (being played in 2022) and 2025 Rugby World Cups as well as the first global partner of WXV, the new global women’s tournament that starts in 2023.While no monetary figure has been attached to this commercial partnership, Gilpin described it as “transformational”.last_img read more

first_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Bath, NC People, Director of Music Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Belleville, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Pittsburgh, PA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Collierville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Terrie Robinson named ACO director for women in church and society Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Events Curate Diocese of Nebraska Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Tags Press Release Service An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Posted Jul 18, 2014 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Press Release Women’s Ministry New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Anglican Communion, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ [Anglican Communion Office press release] The Rev. Terrie Robinson, formerly networks coordinator and women’s desk officer at the Anglican Communion Office, has been named its director for women in church and society.Mrs Robinson1 has moved into the new role following a decision by the Standing Committee2 that more needs to be done to support Communion-wide efforts to promote equal, influential and safe participation of women in the life and decision-making of the churches of the Anglican Communion and society.Speaking about the change of role, Mrs Robinson said, “I’m very excited at the prospect of being able to spend more time working with women and men in the Anglican Communion to promote the full inclusion of women’s gifts, voices and concerns in the life, mission and structures of the Anglican Communion and beyond.The Rev. Terrie Robinson (left) with Africa’s first female bishop the Rt Rev. Ellinah Wamukoya.“There are already so many Anglicans committed to this, who bring every gift imaginable to the task. It will be a blessing to support them and to contribute everything I can to making sure that women are given voice and space wherever they are.“In many ways, my engagement with the Anglican Communion’s Networks will continue. They provide a vital mechanism for Anglicans who want to share their stories and resources, and who want to join in advocacy and pray for each other with greater knowledge and understanding.“I know how important several of the Networks will be to my own ministry as it unfolds. All the Networks will continue to receive the support they need from the Anglican Communion Office to make sure their activities continue to inform decision-making and action at the international level.”The Anglican Communion Office has also recruited Stephanie Taylor to be Information and Records Manager.Mrs Taylor, who come to the ACO from The National Autistic Society where she was Content Manager – Information, Advice and Advocacy.Mrs Taylor said, “I am a passionate believer in the power of information and the difference that dynamically, well-managed, accessible information can make to the lives of individuals, and the effectiveness of organisations. Effective knowledge sharing builds connections and makes things happen, and in a Communion serving 165 countries that’s vital.”Editor’s note1 As there are a variety of ways to refer to clergy across the Anglican Communion, ACNS uses the standard practice of the Church of England which considers ‘The Reverend’ to be an adjective. We therefore refer to priests as ‘The Revd’ once and subsequently use titles: Mr, Mrs, Miss, Bp., Dr. Canon, etc, as appropriate.2 The Standing Committee comprises members elected by the Anglican Consultative Council and of the Primates’ Standing Committee. See http://aco.org/communion/index.cfm In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Albany, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit an Event Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector Columbus, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Tampa, FL last_img read more

first_img Rector Belleville, IL People Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Comments are closed. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Press Release Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Collierville, TN Posted Dec 18, 2014 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Press Release Service Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Albany, NY December 18, 2014 at 5:04 pm What is “transition ministry”? The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Rev. Canon Meghan Froehlich[Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs press release] Bishop Stacy F. Sauls, chief operating officer of The Episcopal Church, has announced that the Rev. Canon Meghan Froehlich has been named acting missioner for transition ministry following a churchwide search.“Meghan was selected for this important position because she brings the strong technical and interpersonal skills essential to this work as well as an innovative mind and creative spirit,” Sauls stated.  “All of us who met her during this process believe she will serve the needs of the church well in this crucial ministry.”Sauls also expressed his appreciation to the members of the interview committee, which included members of the Board of Transition Ministry, Executive Council, the community of transition ministers and the Missionary Society.As acting missioner for transition ministry, her duties include overseeing the programmatic, managerial and budgetary responsibilities for The Episcopal Church Office of Transition Ministry, working with clergy, dioceses, transition ministers throughout the Church, and laity.  She will also analyze the employment needs and trends in The Episcopal Church in order to plan strategically and offer recommendations for transition ministry programs to enhance the ministry of transition with an emphasis on spiritual health and wellness.The acting missioner position is slated through October 2015, after which the program and budget vision set at General Convention 2015 will be implemented.Froehlich’s position with the Missionary Society is within the Mission Department.  She is based in Akron, Ohio.Most recently she was the interim canon to the ordinary for the Episcopal Diocese of Kansas and has served as the rector or assistant rector of churches in the dioceses of Ohio, Dallas and Western North Carolina. She has also been a chaplain, a faculty member of Fresh Start, a consultant and executive leadership coach.She holds a Master of Divinity degree from the Divinity School of Duke University and a bachelors degree in political science from Old Dominion University in Virginia.  She was ordained a priest in June 2000 in the Diocese of Western North Carolina.Froehlich begins her new position in Jan. 5.  She can be reached at [email protected] effective December 22. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Frogmire Anders von Vondervolt says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Featured Events Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Comments (1) Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Smithfield, NC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Froehlich named acting missioner for transition ministry Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Knoxville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Tampa, FL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis last_img read more

first_img [Episcopal News Service — Salt Lake City] The Rev. Gayle Fisher-Stewart served as a police officer with the Metropolitan Police Department in Washington, D.C., for 23 years. She is currently a deacon in the Episcopal Diocese of Washington.As a retired police officer, she has the right to carry a gun in the United States, but chooses not to. Addressing the Claiming Common Ground Against Gun Violence march on the morning of June 28 in Salt Lake City, she explains why the United States needs fewer guns and calls for stronger action to combat gun violence. Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Former police officer Gayle Fisher-Stewart speaks at prayerful procession against gun violence July 3, 2015 at 2:53 pm Thank you, Rev. Gayle, for a relatively balanced presentation on this subject. Let me say up from that I am inclined to agree with your armed clergy friend. That is, I think that if somebody is capable of safely and legally carrying concealed, that it should be their choice (in public places — most states give private businesses and entities the right to exclude concealed carry, which is fine with me). I live in a state that vets concealed carry with testing, extensive background checks, and licensing, which is all fine with me.But here is the topic that I think is more relevant. Discussions about weapons belie a larger question about the morality of self defense, which is a euphemism for what Martin Luther King called “defensive violence”. Is defensive violence moral? Is it ever moral? We have a longstanding theory of just wars. I can think of situations where defending innocent third parties from harm could justify violence. We might, like Bonhoeffer, choose defensive violence and confess it later as the lesser of two evils. Many Episcopalians probably do not give this much thought, because we live relatively safe lives. The most we have likely thought about how to deal with danger or violence is to call law enforcement. So I will ask a follow-up question: Is is any more or less moral to call the police in response to a threat versus we defending ourselves/innocents? My view is that calling the police is merely defensive/deadly force by proxy, and I do not see a moral difference. I only see a practical trade-off: the police are better trained and equipped, while a legally armed citizen on the scene is, well, already on the scene. I have met some very strong pacifists who will argue that using force or deadly force to resist criminal violence is not justified, especially in church. (Do these strong pacifists object to calling the police?) I understand here is a tradition of not bringing weapons into a sanctuary, going back to medieval times. I even had one clergy tell me that the preferred way to deal with a hypothetical situation of an active shooter in church was to essentially tackle him — as long as the sanctity of the building wasn’t violated by the presence of weapons (my paraphrase). Is that morally superior to only use one’s fists or feet to stop someone from harming parishioners? Is it morally superior to give a slower and less effective disarmed defensive response to a deadly attack? To me that hearkens back to Jesus’ criticism of the Pharisees about failing to take care of a practical needs just because it was a sabbath day. If you accept the premise that defensive violence is sometimes warranted, then the only issue I have with concealed carry of firearms is the qualification of the person carrying (hopefully ensured with background checking and licensing).Thank you for letting me post this. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Comments (2) June 29, 2015 at 12:26 am I served as a police officer in Massachusetts. I was issued a handgun. It was the only one I ever had possession of. I never owned my own handgun and do not plan to. Most people who are victims of gun violence know their assailant. In Utah there has been a rise in the number of murder-suicides and the murderer has taken the lives of their own children. When will we wake up from this madness and require background checks, licensing and training and ban the sale of automatic and assault weapons? Video Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Tampa, FL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Marcia Burchstead says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Job Listing Featured Events Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Gun Violence, General Convention 2015, In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Pittsburgh, PA General Convention, This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Collierville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA J.R. Robinson says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Press Release Service Rector Martinsville, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Jobs & Calls AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Belleville, IL Advocacy Peace & Justice, Submit a Press Release Posted Jun 28, 2015 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Smithfield, NC Tags Comments are closed. Gun Violence March 2015, Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC last_img read more

first_img Rector Shreveport, LA Posted Sep 3, 2015 Rector Tampa, FL [Lambeth Palace press release] In a statement on the ongoing migrant crisis facing Europe and the Middle East, Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby said today:“This is a hugely complex and wicked crisis that underlines our human frailty and the fragility of our political systems. My heart is broken by the images and stories of men, women and children who have risked their lives to escape conflict, violence and persecution.“There are no easy answers and my prayers are with those who find themselves fleeing persecution, as well as those who are struggling under immense pressure to develop an effective and equitable response. Now, perhaps more than ever in post-war Europe, we need to commit to joint action across Europe, acknowledging our common responsibility and our common humanity.“As Christians we believe we are called to break down barriers, to welcome the stranger and love them as ourselves (Leviticus 19:34), and to seek the peace and justice of our God, in our world, today.“With winter fast approaching and with the tragic civil war in Syria spiralling further out of control, we must all be aware that the situation could yet worsen significantly. I am encouraged by the positive role that churches, charities and international agencies are already playing, across Europe and in Syria and the surrounding areas, to meet basic humanitarian needs. These efforts may feel trivial in the face of the challenge, but if we all play our part this is a crisis that we can resolve.“We need a holistic response to this crisis that meets immediate humanitarian need while tackling its underlying drivers. I commend the UK Government for its strong commitment to the world’s poorest people through the delivery of the aid budget. It has shown global leadership by providing £900 million since 2012 to the crisis in Syria. It has also shown moral leadership in using Royal Navy ships to save the lives of hundreds who have tried to make the dangerous crossing across the Mediterranean.“I hold in my heart particularly those who are most vulnerable in conflict, and those who we have a special duty to protect. The Government has rightly sought to provide sanctuary to unaccompanied children, women and those who have been victims of, or are at risk of, sexual violence. I welcome this, while urging a renewed commitment to taking in the most vulnerable.“The Church has always been a place of sanctuary for those in need, and Churches in the UK and across Europe have been meeting the need they are presented with. I reaffirm our commitment to the principle of sanctuary for those who require our help and love. The people of these islands have a long and wonderful history of offering shelter and refuge, going back centuries – whether it be Huguenot Christians, Jewish refugees, Ugandan Asians, Vietnamese boat people or many, many more.“It has always been controversial at the time it happened, always been seen as too difficult. Yet each time we have risen to the challenge and our country has been blessed by the result.“We cannot turn our backs on this crisis. We must respond with compassion. But we must also not be naïve in claiming to have the answers to end it. It requires a pan-European response – which means a commitment to serious-minded diplomatic and political debate, but not at the expense of practical action that meets the immediate needs of those most in need of our help.” Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Comments (2) September 3, 2015 at 2:44 pm Your Grace the Archbishop of Canterbury,It is time for you to become more vocal regarding the plight of refugees. In the newspapers, on television, etc, etc. We welcomed your support of the homeless at St.Paul’s Cathedral but in this situation, the public have heard nothing from you. The Country desparately needs your guidance.I am not a Christian in the conventional sense, but understand that Christ said “Am I my Brother’s keeper?” I would say that the answer is a resounding YES!Yours in hope,Carol Henrys Rector Pittsburgh, PA Father Mike Waverly-Shank says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Comments are closed. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET September 5, 2015 at 10:17 am Remember the Bible says – Be kind to the stranger within your gates – for you were strangers in the land of Egypt. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Knoxville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector Columbus, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Events TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Archbishop of Canterbury statement on the migrant crisis Carol Henrys says: Refugees Migration & Resettlement Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Collierville, TN Tags Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Bath, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Archbishop of Canterbury, Submit a Press Release Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Belleville, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Submit an Event Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Anglican Communion, Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Albany, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Job Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group last_img read more