first_imgLate summer into fall is looking like high season for new releases. Here are four upcoming albums we can’t wait to hear.Langhorne_FIXLanghorne Slim & the Law The Spirit MovesRelease Date: August 7Since his last release, 2012’s The Way We Move, folk-rock showman Langhorne Slim (real name Sean Scolnick) has undergone some pretty major life transformations. He moved from the West Coast to East Nashville, became completely sober, and ended some rocky relationships. Call it plenty of fodder for an open-hearted tunesmith, as lead single, the mellow highway cruiser “Changes” leaves little mystery about Slim’s headspace as he sings: “Things could be stranger, but I don’t know how. I’m going through changes now.”steep_canyon_rangers_cover_FIXSteep Canyon RangersRadioRelease Date: August 28The Steep Canyon Rangers continue to step outside the boundaries of the traditional bluegrass persona they created as one of North Carolina’s favorite bands over the past decade and a half. The new Radio, produced by dobro legend Jerry Douglas, finds the group further branching into different areas of roots music. Banjo player Graham Sharp told the Wall Street Journal: “Radio travels the dial from top to bottom. The album tunes into the rock channel for a little while, then the blues, then country, pop and, of course, bluegrass.”PhilCook_FIXPhil CookSouthland MissionRelease Date: September 11Phil Cook is best known as a member of the inventive indie folk trio Megafaun, a lauded band from the North Carolina Triangle with an uncertain future. He’s recently been on tour with Hiss Golden Messenger and not long ago teamed with Bon Iver’s Justin Vernon in the bluesy garage-rock side project The Shouting Matches. Now Cook is stepping out on his own with a new solo album, Southland Mission. Leading single “Great Tide” has a gospel-rock vibe with melodic slide guitar, a hopping Second Line beat, and the soothing harmonies that made Megafaun so enjoyable.WP_StreetDogs_Cover_FIXWidespread Panic Street DogsRelease Date: September 25Earlier this year Panic hunkered down at Echo Mountain Studios in Asheville, N.C., to make its first studio album in five years. During the sessions the Southern jam stalwarts were without founding drummer Todd Nance, who’s been on hiatus since last fall due to undisclosed personal reasons. Filling in ever since has been Duane Trucks—nephew of the Allman Brothers’ Butch Trucks and brother of guitar ace Derek—who’s proven to be a nimble, energetic replacement in the live setting. This should translate on the new record, which includes some road-tested new tunes like “Street Dogs for Breakfast” and the New Orleans-inspired rocker “Cease Fire.” The album’s 12 tracks also feature some interesting covers—lending Panic’s patented Dixie groove bent to Alan Price’s “Sell Sell,” Murray McLauchlan’s “Honky Red,” and Willie Dixon’s “Taildragger.”last_img read more

first_imgPORT AU PRINCE, Haiti, CMC – Ten years after a powerful earthquake hit Haiti on January 12, 2010, the secretary of state for the integration of persons with disabilities, Gerald Oriol Jr., has called on Haitians to remember those who survived the tragedy.“These people, most of whom today live with a disability, are survivors to whom we have a duty of solidarity. Their limitations bear witness to our shortcomings and characterise our multiple challenges to be met. Let us be at the rendezvous of history!“This date remains engraved in our collective memory. That day, the earth spoke to us too hard; it has deeply shaken our bowels. It took 35 seconds to see hundreds of thousands of bruised bodies; to take away hundreds of thousands of loved ones, to collapse part of our economy and our society. This earthquake separated us from many of our loved ones and left us with unfathomable suffering, the many consequences of which are still before our eyes. We will remember it forever.”Oriol, in his message, said the country must be prepared in the event of another act of nature.Ten years later, should we not ask ourselves if nature’s message has been understood? In this time let us be in reflection and especially in action. We must be able to say: never! Never again! Let’s prepare the next day and be ready !”Meanwhile, the German Embassy in its message said the scars from the physical damage and moral suffering caused by the earthquake remain.“One of the things that caught the attention of Embassy colleagues, who were there at the time, was this impressive movement of solidarity among Haitians that was observed immediately after the disaster. Before aid from outside arrived, the Haitians, with the means at hand, took care of themselves, illustrating this popular belief ‘Pwoblèm nou youn se pou nou tout’.As we commemorate the memory of the missing and pay tribute to the victims of January 12, 2010, the German Embassy expresses the wish that this spirit of solidarity and resilience continue to prevail in all spheres of activity of the Haitian Nation and that they ultimately lead to a better future for the entire population,” the embassy said in a statement.The powerful earthquake killed an estimated 220,000 people, displaced over one million and about 300,000 were injured.last_img read more