first_imgSkunks are one of the most common, and often unwelcome, nocturnal species that visit our backyards here in Georgia. Skunk breeding season has passed, but we are quickly approaching the time of year when females will birth their young.There are two species of skunk native to Georgia: the striped skunk and the eastern spotted skunk.Striped skunks are commonly referred to as “polecats” and are probably one of the most recognizable mammals nationwide thanks to cartoon characters like Pepe Le Pew and the ironically named Flower from Disney’s “Bambi.” These small critters are about the size of a common house cat and are known for their black fur and white stripes.Eastern spotted skunks are sometimes referred to as “civet cats” and are significantly smaller than striped skunks. They don’t have the white stripe down their backs. Instead, spotted skunks most often have horizontal white stripes on their neck and shoulders and asymmetrical, elongated spots on their sides. They also have white spots on their heads and between their eyes.While both species of Georgia’s skunks are quite beautiful, they are often viewed negatively due to the pungent, musky odor they can emit. This odor lingers for days and can become nauseating for some people.Aside from their odoriferous smell, skunks often set up dens close to or underneath dwellings. They are prone to digging up lawns and golf courses in search of insects and grubworms. In doing so, they leave conical shaped holes in well-groomed turf. Skunks may also raid backyard poultry pens and eat eggs and birds; eat garden vegetables; and damage beehives.In addition to damaging lawns, denning under buildings and having a rather pungent odor, skunks carry a variety of zoonotic diseases, including leptospirosis and intestinal roundworms, and are one of the primary vectors for rabies in the United States. The potential for human exposure to rabies from skunks can be significant due to skunks’ inclination to urban and suburban areas.There are a variety of control options to alleviate damage caused by skunks, but most homeowners aren’t comfortable trapping skunks because of the animals’ potential for carrying rabies and tendency to spray. Nuisance-wildlife removal specialists may be better equipped to remove skunks.Control methods that do not involve contact with live animals include habitat modification and exclusion. The mice that tend to call crawl spaces, sheds and barns home often attract skunks to these spaces. Rodent management often eliminates the skunk problem.In addition to rodent control, removing debris, lumber piles and junk cars eliminates potential denning sites and discourages skunks from using the area for a den location. Lawn treatments for grubs eliminates the food source and skunks’ motivation to dig.In addition to habitat modification, skunks should be cut off from areas where they could potentially den. All foundation openings should be sealed off with wire mesh, sheet metal or concrete. Fences constructed around lawns and gardens should be at least 3 feet tall and buried 18 inches below the surface to prevent digging. Hardware cloth or chicken wire works well for exclusion fences. If skunks already use a crawl space, make sure they have left the area before installing exclusionary devices to prevent them from dying under the building.Skunks’ black-and-white fur makes them one of the most beautiful animals to make our backyards their homes. Skunks can be beneficial because they eat many of the insect and grub species that can cause significant damage to turfgrass. However, because of their musky odor and potential for disease, most homeowners don’t want them around.Use the techniques recommended here by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension to keep skunks from becoming an issue in your backyard.To learn more from Michael Foster about controlling nuisance wildlife, attend the Agroforestry and Wildlife Field Day on Sept. 20, 2018. To register, go to www.ugagriffincontinuinged.com/awfd.last_img read more

first_imgAdmiral Eduardo Barcellar Leal Ferreira was born on June 2, 1952, in Rio de Janeiro. He is the son of the late Admiral Luiz Leal Ferreira. The new commander of the Navy joined the military in 1971. He graduated as a midshipman from the Naval Academy in 1974. Last Wednesday there was intense activity at the Brazilian Presidential Palace due to the appointment of the country’s new Armed Forces commanders. President Dilma Rousseff and Defense Minister Jaques Wagner met over the course of the day with the current director of the Navy, Admiral Julio Soares de Moura Neto; director of the Army, General Enzo Peri; and director of the Air Force, Major General Juniti Saito, to select the individuals responsible for the public policy and administrative and operational leadership of Brazil’s military. Throughout his career, he served in more than 20 command, advisory, and instructor roles with the FAB. Prior to his appointment as the head of the Air Force, Gen. Rossato served as the head of the Brazilian Aeronautics Command. Nivaldo Luiz Rossato was born on August 26, 1951, in the city of São Gabriel, in Rio Grande do Sul’s southeast. He joined the Brazilian Air Force (FAB) in 1969, and graduated from the Air Force Academy (AFA) in December 1975. He became a general officer in 2003, and was promoted to his current rank on March 31, 2011. Admiral Leal Ferreira Gen. Rossato led the Fighter Pilot Group, accumulating more than 3,500 hours of flight time. In addition, he has completed courses for fighter pilots, squadron leaders, operational troop transport pilots and civil aviation inspectors. Villas Bôas has extensive experience in command and advisory roles. He served with distinction in the Amazon region, where he commanded the 1st Jungle Infantry Battalion in Manaus, and later led the Joint Military Command of the Amazon Region (CMA). Throughout his career, he served in more than 20 command, advisory, and instructor roles with the FAB. Prior to his appointment as the head of the Air Force, Gen. Rossato served as the head of the Brazilian Aeronautics Command. Majesties, Am delighted to join Brazil as corps fellow at the rank of GENERAL B , Please recue me coz am at the verge of death yet i can do a lot though i have reached at the depth of death . Best Regards US GEN John B Gasasira Born on November 7, 1951, in Cruz Alta, in the central region of Rio Grande do Sul, Eduardo Dias Costa Villas Bôas is the son of Antônio Villas Bôas, who also served in the military. He joined the Army Cadet Preparatory School in Campinas (São Paulo) in 1967. Villas Bôas is a swimmer and water polo player who graduated from the Agulhas Negras Military Academy (AMAN) in 1973. Leal Ferreira is an electronics specialist who has performed a range of administrative functions and received various awards over the course of his 40-year career. He served onboard naval vessels for 16 years, spending 1,300 days at sea. He reached the rank of admiral in March 2013. General Rossato By Dialogo January 12, 2015 Leal Ferreira is an electronics specialist who has performed a range of administrative functions and received various awards over the course of his 40-year career. He served onboard naval vessels for 16 years, spending 1,300 days at sea. He reached the rank of admiral in March 2013. Admiral Leal Ferreira Born on November 7, 1951, in Cruz Alta, in the central region of Rio Grande do Sul, Eduardo Dias Costa Villas Bôas is the son of Antônio Villas Bôas, who also served in the military. He joined the Army Cadet Preparatory School in Campinas (São Paulo) in 1967. Villas Bôas is a swimmer and water polo player who graduated from the Agulhas Negras Military Academy (AMAN) in 1973. General Villas Bôas Gen. Rossato led the Fighter Pilot Group, accumulating more than 3,500 hours of flight time. In addition, he has completed courses for fighter pilots, squadron leaders, operational troop transport pilots and civil aviation inspectors. Admiral Eduardo Barcellar Leal Ferreira was born on June 2, 1952, in Rio de Janeiro. He is the son of the late Admiral Luiz Leal Ferreira. The new commander of the Navy joined the military in 1971. He graduated as a midshipman from the Naval Academy in 1974. Villas Bôas was promoted to general in July 2011. In 2014, he assumed leadership of the Army’s Land Operations Command (COTER), and was one of those responsible for security and defense planning during the 2014 FIFA World Cup. Prior to achieving the highest rank in the Navy, Leal Ferreira was in command of the War College, an academic institution operating under the Ministry of Defense. He also served as the commander in chief of the Naval Fleet, director of Ports and Coastal Areas and commander of the 7th Naval District, headquartered in Brasília. General Villas Bôas Prior to achieving the highest rank in the Navy, Leal Ferreira was in command of the War College, an academic institution operating under the Ministry of Defense. He also served as the commander in chief of the Naval Fleet, director of Ports and Coastal Areas and commander of the 7th Naval District, headquartered in Brasília. The swearing in dates of the new military commanders has yet to be determined. Last Wednesday there was intense activity at the Brazilian Presidential Palace due to the appointment of the country’s new Armed Forces commanders. President Dilma Rousseff and Defense Minister Jaques Wagner met over the course of the day with the current director of the Navy, Admiral Julio Soares de Moura Neto; director of the Army, General Enzo Peri; and director of the Air Force, Major General Juniti Saito, to select the individuals responsible for the public policy and administrative and operational leadership of Brazil’s military. The swearing in dates of the new military commanders has yet to be determined. Villas Bôas has extensive experience in command and advisory roles. He served with distinction in the Amazon region, where he commanded the 1st Jungle Infantry Battalion in Manaus, and later led the Joint Military Command of the Amazon Region (CMA). General Rossato Shortly after 8:00 a.m., the Office of the President released an official notice with the names of the new directors of the Armed Forces: Admiral Eduardo Barcellar Leal Ferreira will be the commander of Brazil’s Navy; General Eduardo Dias da Costa Villas Bôas will command the Brazilian Army; and the Brazilian Air Force will be under the command of General Nivaldo Luiz Rossato. Shortly after 8:00 a.m., the Office of the President released an official notice with the names of the new directors of the Armed Forces: Admiral Eduardo Barcellar Leal Ferreira will be the commander of Brazil’s Navy; General Eduardo Dias da Costa Villas Bôas will command the Brazilian Army; and the Brazilian Air Force will be under the command of General Nivaldo Luiz Rossato. Nivaldo Luiz Rossato was born on August 26, 1951, in the city of São Gabriel, in Rio Grande do Sul’s southeast. He joined the Brazilian Air Force (FAB) in 1969, and graduated from the Air Force Academy (AFA) in December 1975. He became a general officer in 2003, and was promoted to his current rank on March 31, 2011. Villas Bôas was promoted to general in July 2011. In 2014, he assumed leadership of the Army’s Land Operations Command (COTER), and was one of those responsible for security and defense planning during the 2014 FIFA World Cup. last_img read more