first_imgImenco Corrosion Technology has been awarded a contract to deliver equipment for corrosion protection (cathodic protection) of the offshore wind farm – Hornsea Project One off the Yorkshire coast in UK.The contract has been awarded by Ørsted Wind Power – the world’s largest developer and operator of offshore renewable energy. The wind farm consists of 174 wind turbines with a total capacity of 1,2 Gigawatt.The contract is for systems to connect sacrificial anodes to the turbine foundations and consist of Imenco’s Piranha earthing connectors, cables and cable protectors.Following Imenco’s first delivery of cathodic protection equipment for offshore wind projects in 2016, the company has been awarded contracts for delivery of similar solutions for 8 European offshore wind power projects in UK, Germany and Belgium.Imenco has developed a series of solutions for connection of sacrificial anodes to various subsea structures. The solutions are all made to be installed without the use of divers and are all based on the same patented technology. In addition to offshore wind, the main application is found in lifetime extension of offshore oil and gas assets like pipelines, subsea production systems as well as floating and fixed platforms.last_img read more

first_imgTodd LamirandeAPTN News Clarence Sumner drove over 2,300 kilometres, and spent the night across the street from 10 Wellington in Gatineau, Que, the country’s headquarters for Indigenous Affairs across the river from Ottawa to bring allegations of vote buying in his community.He wanted to meet Indigenous Services Minister Seamus O’Regan to see if anything can be done about the way elections are held in his community.“I want the leaders of this country to know I’m here,” he said.“I want them to know that the leaders of my community have a turned a blind eye and a deaf ear to try and be honest and do things fairly.”Sumner is appealing the 2017 election held on the Pinaymootang First Nation in Manitoba, where he alleges money is often exchanged for votes.“It’s a norm. it’s become a norm in my community to buy votes, mail in ballots preferably,” he said.Pinaymootang is located 240 kilometres northwest of Winnipeg.He met with two bureaucrats from Crown Indigenous Relations, Yves Dennoncourt, acting director of Governance Operations Directorate, and Marc Boivin, director of research Policy and Legislative Initiatives.They told Sumner they would follow up on his complaint.Sumner also delivered a copy of his appeal to Indigenous Services.He travelled all the way to Ottawa because he believes it’s more productive to meet people in person.“I believe that the minister (O’Regan) can better exercise his judgement if he could read some of the appeal.”Sumner successfully appealed the 2011 election when then Aboriginal Affairs minister Bernard Valcourt threw out the results and banned chief Garnet Woodhouse and three councilors from running for six years.But Woodhouse declared himself innocent of vote buying and appealed Valcourt’s decision to Federal Court.He was successful in 2013.APTN News attempted to contact Woodhouse for comment but calls were not returned.“Rather than being upset and getting mad at my leaders and my community I decided to use that energy to good and physically bring myself here in my own vehicle,” said Sumner.Sumner said he will stick around southern Ontario until September 16th to try and meet the leaders of all the federal parties. On that date nominations for chief and council will begin for Pinaymootang’s next election.“I’m out here because I believe that honesty will prevail.”Sumner never did meet with O’[email protected]@toddlamirandelast_img read more

first_imgAddThis Jade Boyd Rice University 713-348-6778 [email protected] First quantum grant to fund stem cell repair of damage from stroke Team from Rice, Baylor College of Medicine aims for ‘neuro-vascular regeneration’ The National Institutes of Health has named researchers at Baylor College of Medicine (BCM) and Rice University in Houston as the first and only recipients of the inaugural Quantum Grant for their international research initiative to regenerate damaged brain cells and blood vessels for the treatment of stroke. The three-year, $2.9 million grant, funded by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), part of the NIH, will support research on neuro-vascular regeneration, which will make new brain tissues in the laboratory. The new brain tissue is planned to have its own blood supply to allow it to be placed into the damaged brains of stroke patients where it will provide a source of neural and vascular cells that will continue to develop and differentiate, repairing the injured tissue in the process. “This project represents an integrated effort among leading scientists who have jointly authored numerous publications, mentored students and postdoctoral fellows, as well as collaborated on Bioengineering Research Partnership grants,” said Jennifer West, who is leading the project’s efforts at Rice. West is the Isabel C. Cameron Professor of Bioengineering and director of Rice’s Institute of Biosciences and Bioengineering . The newly created NIBIB Quantum Grants Program supports researchers in the development of innovative biomedical technologies in hopes of making a significant impact in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease. Funding was awarded to only one grant application out of more than 100 submitted. Karen Hirschi, deputy director of the Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Center within the Center for Cell and Gene Therapy at BCM, is the principal investigator for the “Neuro-Vascular Regeneration” project, which will be conducted in conjunction with an interdisciplinary team of researchers at Rice, the National Institute for Medical Research in London, and King’s College in London . “Each member of our team has made significant contributions to the advancement of their respective fields of research and will now be able to devote substantial efforts to integrating their work and developing methods of using neuro-vascular regeneration to help stroke victims,” Hirschi said. The project team members come from diverse and complementary areas of expertise in developmental neurobiology and vascular biology, stem cell biology, genetics, biomedical imaging, tissue engineering, and clinical cellular therapies. Spanning fields of science that include cell and molecular biology, animal models of disease, and hopefully human clinical trials, the “Neuro-Vascular Regeneration” project falls in line with the NIH roadmap for the development of multi-disciplinary and translational science. The BCM team also includes project co-developer Mary Dickinson, assistant professor of molecular physiology and biophysics at BCM; Dr. Thomas Zwaka, assistant professor of molecular and cellular biology in the Center for Cell and Gene Therapy at BCM; and Malcolm Brenner, professor of medicine and pediatrics and director of the Center for Cell and Gene Therapy at BCM. Robin Lovell-Badge, head of the division of developmental genetics at the National Institute for Medical Research in London, serves as co-principal investigator of the project. Other investigators in London include Jack Price and Mike Modo, both of the Centre for the Cellular Basis of Behaviour at the Institute of Psychiatry at King’s College. Share Ross Tomlin Baylor College of Medicine 713-798-4712 [email protected] last_img read more