first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest This will be my 4th year making the pilgrimage from Columbus, Ohio to Rochester, Minnesota over the 4 days of the Pro Farmer Midwest Crop Tour. Not only do I cover the eastern leg of the tour for The Ohio Ag Net and Ohio’s Country Journal, I also collect information and interviews for farm broadcasters all over the U.S. who are members of the National Association of Farm Broadcasting (NAFB).Almost everywhere I go I am asked what it is like being on the tour and how one gets the chance to take part.Being on the tour is everything that one would expect it to be. The days begin early as we comb our way through dewy green fields of corn and soybeans as the sun comes up, then reminisce and compare stories of the crop encounters, good and bad, as the sun disappears.I liken this tour to a battle. It is just you and your team of scouts with tools in hand, covering territory that is only seen by those who use the narrow gravel roads in some of the most rural parts of the Midwest. Conquering field after field and gathering information that will be of value to those that farm the ground we cover and to those that seek the information that may or may not make the markets seem a bit more fair, if only for a day.The scars from razor sharp corn leaves, a sweat-drenched hat and the mud from 20 different fields in 20 different counties on the bottom of your boots is not all you have to show for a day’s work.When it is all said and done, all of the Pro Farmer Crop Tour scouts will cover close to 80% of America’s corn and soybean growing regions. We rack up thousands of miles, piles of data, numerous tales (some true and others not so much) and quite honestly, more fun than I will have in many other weeks of the year.I do take pride in being a part of this annual journey and my hope is that as you follow along over the next 4 days, your will be very well informed and somewhat entertained.Keep watching as I continually update my daily journal of the 2015 Pro Farmer Midwest Crop Tour and thank you for allowing me the opportunity to share the good, the bad and the ugly as we trek across the recently weather-challenged heartland of America.last_img read more

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The National Dairy Shrine recently announced the recipients of scholarships for 2019, including the $1000 scholarships given in honor of Maurice Core, the long-time Executive Secretary of the American Jersey Cattle Association, and former Executive Director of the National Dairy Shrine. The funds for this award were donated by the friends of Maurice Core. The Core Scholarships are given to freshman status students working toward a degree in dairy/animal science or related majors. Among those recipients is Sarah Lehner of Delaware, Ohio who is a student at the Ohio State University majoring in Animal Science and Agribusiness Economics.The National Dairy Shrine is providing 40 scholarships worth $47,000 to students around the country this year.last_img read more

After the arrests of several senior FIFA leaders and widespread evidence of graft, bribery and general corruption at the highest levels of the global soccer conglomerate, FIFA’s selection of Qatar to host the 2022 World Cup has come under renewed criticism. The indictments allege that vote-buying occurred in past World Cup host selections, and there have been other allegations that millions of dollars were paid to rig the vote for Qatar in 2010.And when you look at all the World Cup hosts since 1978, it’s clear that Qatar is in many ways an outlier.Compared with other World Cup hosts, Qatar is at the extremes on almost every metric I looked at. The data wasn’t perfect — two of the data sets I used weren’t measured annually when it would have been ideal if they were (the United Nations Development Program’s carbon-emissions reading and Reporters Without Borders’ Press Freedom Index). Also, the Press Freedom Index did not exist before 2002, so I used the 2002 mark for the World Cups that came before that year. It’s an estimation, but because that measurement is less susceptible to annual change, I felt safe in using it. And one last thing while we’re here: The Elo and GDP numbers for Russia and Qatar aren’t projections but are the most recent data available.Qatar was definitely not selected for its temperate weather in June, the typical time for the FIFA tournament. There has historically been some variation here — Argentina’s average June temperature is in the low 50s (it being in the Southern Hemisphere and all), and Mexico’s is in the mid-70s. But Qatar’s average June temperature is in the 90s.Perhaps Qatar is a real soccer up-and-comer, then? Not quite! I pulled the Elo rating of each men’s national team on the first game they played the year they hosted the cup1The last game of the previous year for Colombia, which resigned from hosting the 1986 cup and did not play soccer that year, and the most recent game for Russia and Qatar. to get the gist of how good the teams were on the world stage. Qatar has the second-lowest score ever.2Might they improve substantially in the next seven years? Sure, it’s possible. But the point is they’re not an unrecognized powerhouse in the sport at this point in time, and the fact that the host nation gets a free bid may mean they don’t have a ton of incentive to drastically improve.And it’s not like Qatar holds a bulk of the world’s population, either. Typically the country that gets the cup has somewhere around 1 percent to 5 percent of the world’s population, but not Qatar. With a projected population of 2.24 million in 2022, it’ll have a whopping 0.03 percent of the global population within its borders in a few years, not counting the spectators. What’s more, that population mostly comprises people who weren’t born in Qatar — as of 2013, according to the U.N., 1.6 million of the country’s 2.2 million people were international migrants.Although Qatar will be a global hub for sports journalists in several years, FIFA apparently did not select the country to highlight its illustrious human-rights record. Qatar has extreme restrictions on press freedoms that put it in league with Russia (the 2018 host) and Brazil (the 2014 one). They have a very high score on the Press Freedom Index, where a low score indicates a great deal of freedom.It’s also not for the nation’s climate record, either, as it’s by far the highest polluter — measured in metric tons of carbon emitted per capita. And that’s on a list that includes America. That was our category to lose!But Qatar does have one metric by which it is off-the-charts outstanding: gross domestic product per capita. Namely, it’s a small country that makes a whole lot of money. In the chart, we’re looking at the ratio of GDP per capita the year each nation hosted the cup to the United States’ GDP per capita that year, to keep it apples to apples.None of this proves vote-rigging, obviously. But when a country lacks many of the competitive advantages of other countries’ bids, some extra scrutiny is probably worthwhile. read more

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 17 Dec 2015 – The Turks and Caicos is now among the six countries in the Greater Caribbean with the ‘Don’t Pack a Pest’ program activated. The Ministry of Health, Agriculture and Human Services joined by partners from the Florida Department of Agriculture, the Turks and Caicos Islands Airports Authority and the TCI Customs Department rolled out, at the Provo International Airport, the initiative which will encourage travelers to be careful of what they are packing so that harmful pests are not moving about and causing damage to the flora or fauna of the various nations. The ‘Don’t Pack a Pest’ initiative is another feather in the cap for the TCI as executives in the Ministry and the TCIAA were commended for swift action on providing the requisite information so that the program could be implemented. Work on the ‘Don’t pack a Pest’ started as a concept in 2011, but more vigorously as a standard of safety in the TCI earlier this year. It is said the outreach initiative was established in record time. Former Premier says PNP left plan for Salt Cay airport, but there is no evidence of the claim Airports Authority commanded to protect South Caicos airport by airline Recommended for you Related Items:agriculture dePARTMENT, customs department, dont pack a pest, Tciaa Airports Authority reveals sabotage at South Caicos Airport Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more