first_imgThe action gets underway this evening with St Michaels at home to Kilsheelan United at 6pm. Michaels will start as favourites to progress to the second round.All other games take place tomorrow.last_img

first_imgHolland lost ground in their bid to secure automatic qualification for Euro 2016 as they were beaten 1-0 by Group A leaders Iceland on Thursday after being reduced to 10 men in the first half.Gylfi Sigurdsson scored the only goal of the game for Iceland from the penalty spot in the 51st minute after the hosts had Bruno Martins Indi sent off in the 33rd minute.The defeat means Holland remain third in the group, eight points behind leaders Iceland and six adrift of second-placed Czech Republic, who beat Kazakhstan 2-1.Yuri Logvinenko opened the scoring for the Kazakhs in the 21st minute but two second-half goals from Milan Skoda, including an 86th-minute winner, saw the Czechs keep their qualification on track. Turkey drew 1-1 with Latvia in the other Group A game.Elsewhere, Wales maintained their grip on the top of Group B and continued their unbeaten qualification run with a 1-0 win over Cyprus. Gareth Bale headed the only goal of the game in the 82nd minute to snatch the victory which kept Wales three clear of second-placed Belgium, who defeated Bosnia and Herzegovina 3-1.Roma striker Edin Dzeko put Bosnia and Herzegovina ahead in the 15th minute before Marouane Fellaini and new Manchester City midfielder Kevin De Bruyne put the hosts 2-1 ahead at half-time in Brussels. Eden Hazard sealed the win from the penalty spot in the 78th minute. Israel kept alive their hopes of a top-two finish in Group B with a comfortable 4-0 victory over rock-bottom Andorra in Haifa. Eran Zahavi struck the opener after just three minutes, with Nir Bitton making it 2-0 with a 22nd-minute header. Brighton striker Tomer Hemed added a third from the penalty spot four minutes later before Munas Dabbur completed the scoring.Meanwhile, Graziano Pelle’s 69th-minute goal saw Italy defeat Malta 1-0 to move top of Group H while Norway remain third after their 1-0 win over Bulgaria, Vegard Forren scoring the only goal just before the hour mark.Croatia drew 0-0 with Azerbaijan in the other game to slip into second place as their goal difference is worse than Italy’s.–Follow Joy Sports on Twitter: @Joy997FM. Our hashtag is #JoySportslast_img read more

first_imgObesity is increasing more rapidly in the world’s rural areas than in cities, according to a study of global trends in body-mass index (BMI). The study, published in the journal Nature, analysed the height and weight data of over 112 million adults across urban and rural areas of 200 countries and territories between 1985 and 2017. Height and weight can be used to calculate BMI, an internationally recognised scale which tells us whether an individual has a healthy weight for their height, said researchers led by Imperial College London in the UK. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfThe study found that from 1985 to 2017, BMI rose by an average of two kilogrammes per square metre (kg/m2) in women and 2.2 kg/m2 in men globally, equivalent to each person becoming five to six kg heavier. Over half of the global rise over these 33 years was due to increases in BMI in rural areas. In some low and middle income countries, rural areas were responsible for over 80 per cent of the increase. The team found that since 1985, average BMI in rural areas has increased by 2.1 kg/m2 in both women and men. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveHowever, in cities, the increase was 1.3 kg/m2 and 1.6 kg/m2 in women and men respectively. In 1985, urban men and women in over three quarters of the countries had a higher BMI than their rural counterparts, they said. Over time, the gap between urban and rural BMI in many of these countries shrank or even reversed. “The results of this massive global study overturn commonly held perceptions that more people living in cities is the main cause of the global rise in obesity,” said Professor Majid Ezzati of Imperial’s School of Public Health. “This means that we need to rethink how we tackle this global health problem,” Ezzati said. The team found important differences between high-, middle-, and low-income countries. In high-income countries, the study showed that BMI has been generally higher in rural areas since 1985, especially for women. The researchers suggest this is due to the disadvantages experienced by those living outside cities: lower income and education, limited availability and higher price of healthy foods, and fewer leisure and sports facilities. “Discussions around public health tend to focus more on the negative aspects of living in cities,” said Ezzati. “In fact, cities provide a wealth of opportunities for better nutrition, more physical exercise and recreation, and overall improved health, which are often harder to find in rural areas,” he said. Rural areas in low- and middle-income countries have seen shifts towards higher incomes, better infrastructure, more mechanised agriculture and increased car use. These factors not only bring numerous health benefits, but also lead to lower energy expenditure and to more spending on food, which can be processed and low-quality when sufficient regulations are not in place. All these factors contribute to faster increase in BMI in rural areas, researchers said. “As countries increase in wealth, the challenge for rural populations changes from affording enough to eat, to affording good quality food,” said Ezzati. The main exception to the global trend was sub-Saharan Africa where women gained weight more rapidly in cities. This was possibly because of more low-energy work, such as office work, less need for physical domestic tasks and greater access to processed foods, researchers said.last_img read more