first_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Bath, NC People, Director of Music Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Belleville, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Pittsburgh, PA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Collierville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Terrie Robinson named ACO director for women in church and society Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Events Curate Diocese of Nebraska Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Tags Press Release Service An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Posted Jul 18, 2014 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Press Release Women’s Ministry New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Anglican Communion, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ [Anglican Communion Office press release] The Rev. Terrie Robinson, formerly networks coordinator and women’s desk officer at the Anglican Communion Office, has been named its director for women in church and society.Mrs Robinson1 has moved into the new role following a decision by the Standing Committee2 that more needs to be done to support Communion-wide efforts to promote equal, influential and safe participation of women in the life and decision-making of the churches of the Anglican Communion and society.Speaking about the change of role, Mrs Robinson said, “I’m very excited at the prospect of being able to spend more time working with women and men in the Anglican Communion to promote the full inclusion of women’s gifts, voices and concerns in the life, mission and structures of the Anglican Communion and beyond.The Rev. Terrie Robinson (left) with Africa’s first female bishop the Rt Rev. Ellinah Wamukoya.“There are already so many Anglicans committed to this, who bring every gift imaginable to the task. It will be a blessing to support them and to contribute everything I can to making sure that women are given voice and space wherever they are.“In many ways, my engagement with the Anglican Communion’s Networks will continue. They provide a vital mechanism for Anglicans who want to share their stories and resources, and who want to join in advocacy and pray for each other with greater knowledge and understanding.“I know how important several of the Networks will be to my own ministry as it unfolds. All the Networks will continue to receive the support they need from the Anglican Communion Office to make sure their activities continue to inform decision-making and action at the international level.”The Anglican Communion Office has also recruited Stephanie Taylor to be Information and Records Manager.Mrs Taylor, who come to the ACO from The National Autistic Society where she was Content Manager – Information, Advice and Advocacy.Mrs Taylor said, “I am a passionate believer in the power of information and the difference that dynamically, well-managed, accessible information can make to the lives of individuals, and the effectiveness of organisations. Effective knowledge sharing builds connections and makes things happen, and in a Communion serving 165 countries that’s vital.”Editor’s note1 As there are a variety of ways to refer to clergy across the Anglican Communion, ACNS uses the standard practice of the Church of England which considers ‘The Reverend’ to be an adjective. We therefore refer to priests as ‘The Revd’ once and subsequently use titles: Mr, Mrs, Miss, Bp., Dr. Canon, etc, as appropriate.2 The Standing Committee comprises members elected by the Anglican Consultative Council and of the Primates’ Standing Committee. See http://aco.org/communion/index.cfm In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Albany, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit an Event Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector Columbus, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Tampa, FL last_img read more

first_imgABC News(PENSACOLA, Fla.) — Hurricane Florence dropped to a Category 2 storm on Thursday with winds of 105 mph as it moved toward Bermuda and potentially the East Coast.The storm had risen briefly to Category 4 Wednesday with winds of 130 mph before weakening to a Category 3 and then a Category 2. The storm was forecast to strengthen again into a Category 3 hurricane by the end of the weekend into next week.A Category 3 hurricane qualifies as a major storm, while winds from 130 to 156 mph bump it up to Category 4. A Category 5 hurricane, the strongest, has winds of at least 157 mph.Florence was expected to continue to move northwest through the weekend and approach Bermuda around Monday or Tuesday.It may be close to the East Coast by the middle or end of next week.Florence will likely bring large waves that could cause life-threatening surf and rip currents on the East Coast from Florida to Maine.With hurricane season in full swing, another tropical wave is behind Florence — Helene — potentially becoming the next storm.Peak hurricane season is from mid-August through mid-October. The peak date for hurricane season, on average, is Sept. 10.The new storms formed just as tropical depression Gordon left flooding and rain behind for the Gulf Coast.Parts of Florida saw almost 10 inches of rain.The remnants from Gordon continued into Arkansas Thursday morning.Flood watches have been issued after parts of Kansas saw severe flooding Wednesday. Parts of Iowa have seen more than 10 inches in the past few days. Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

first_imgAs expected, Bolt, the 100m and 200m world record holder, showed phenomenal pace over the turf.He was proud of the header he scored in a practice game, but admits having much to learn.“I’m tall, so it’s one of the things I have practised over the years,” he said of his header with sweat pouring down his face.“I was working hard out there, I wanted to play my best, move and give the guys options.”Share on: WhatsApp Pages: 1 2 Nearly 200 journalists and around 1,500 fans saw the eight-time Olympic gold medallist put through his paces with the first-team squad at Dortmund’s training ground.Having already trained with the team behind closed doors on Thursday, Friday’s open session could be seen as a publicity stunt as both Bolt and Dortmund are sponsored by Puma.The Bundesliga club live-streamed the training session and in China alone 1.2 million viewers tuned in.The 31-year-old Bolt insists he is deadly serious about starting a new career – at an age when most footballers are hanging up their boots.– ‘Unfit’ –Bolt, who retired from athletics last year, admits he lacks the endurance fitness football demands. Dortmund, Germany | AFP | Athletics legend Usain Bolt insists he is serious about realising his dream of becoming a top-class footballer after training with Borussia Dortmund.“I really want to try and make it professionally, to play at a high level,” the sprint superstar told reporters on Friday at the German league club.“My goal is to make a top team and play in one of the top leagues in the world.”center_img “Overall, I’d give myself a seven out of ten,” he said.“It was fun, the guys were cool and they were welcoming, but I can tell I was unfit.“I like to play on the wing, right now I am unfit so I try to stay up top (as a striker).“I’ve heard a lot about the fans here – that really was an experience.”last_img read more

first_imgLast month, Governor Andrew Cuomo said healthcare workers would be allowed to use the drug in combination with antibiotics to treat patients with severe cases of the virus.Trump would not let Fauci answer the question about efficacy of hydroxychloroquine.— Jim Acosta (@Acosta) April 6, 2020 It is likely that Governor Cuomo’s younger brother, CNN Prime Time host Chris Cuomo, who has the coronavirus, has also been prescribed anti-malaria drug hydroxychloroquine to help fight his high fever. To the chagrin of CNN reporters and anchors, New York state health officials say as many as four-thousand coronavirus patients across the state have been given the “unproven” anti-malaria drug hydroxychloroquine to help fight off the coronavirus. President Donald Trump has been touting the potential life-saving benefit of the newly FDA approved drug against COVID-19.last_img read more

first_imgFacebook19Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Washington State Historical SocietyMargaret Wetherbee hit the ground running at the Washington State Historical Society, joining the organization days after its buildings closed due to safety protocols around the coronavirus pandemic. “My first day included developing a remote working plan for the Research Center team,” said Wetherbee. “Now, I’m reaching out to citizens across the state to ask for their participation in documenting this historic event for the Historical Society’s collections. We want to capture what you’re going through right now as it unfolds, because this is an extraoridinary time in our history. We will continue to collect as we experience the impacts over the coming years.”Washington’s coronavirus history will be notable as one of the first pandemic hot spots in the United States. The Historical Society’s director, Jennifer Kilmer, remarked, “Future Washingtonians will research these days, asking how we coped with the suddenly vacated office buildings, curtailed services, and medical supply shortages. They’ll want to know know how this event impacted our lives on a personal level. Just as we are now looking to the 1918 flu epidemic for insight into our present experience, folks in the future will want to know about our Stay Home/Stay Healthy protocol, and how we managed to come together to help one another.”The Historical Society is asking for digital content including (but not limited to) photographs, audio and video clips, screenshots of social media memes or posts, reports, correspondence, observations and anecdotes. The Historical Society would also like physical objects and ephemera (home made masks, coronavirus closure notices, decals, diaries, letters, etc.) but asks that you gather and save objects until their Research Center reopens. For details, see WashingtonHistory.org /yourCOVID19story.Wetherbee joined the Historical Society following the recent retirement of Head of Collections Lynette Miller, who had worked with the agency for more than two decades. “We are excited to have Maggie with us to build upon the great accomplishments of Lynette Miller and our talented collections team. Maggie brings a wealth of knowledge regarding collections care, as well as a strong commitment to preserving the history of diverse communities,” said Kilmer.A fifth generation Washingtonian, Wetherbee has worked as a collections professional at the Fort Nisqually Living History Museum in Tacoma, the Japanese American National Museum in Los Angeles, the Riverside Metropolitan Museum in Riverside, and others. Her passion for the stories of the Evergreen State began at a young age.“My love of preservation, archives, and collections started in my great-grandfather’s hand-built barn in Leavenworth. As a museum professional, my work has focused on opening collections to the cultural groups that are represented, to the families that have donated, and to new audiences through digital initiatives that can be accessed by all,” she said.The well-documented history of the women in Wetherbee’s family also inspires her, including her family’s connection to Japanese American history. “In 1936, my great aunt married a Japanese American man. When World War II arrived, she had to choose, did she go to Minidoka with her husband or did she stay and try to save the family property? She stayed. Her husband went to Minidoka, joined the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, the all Japanese American unit and still the most highly decorated unit in the military. Working at the Japanese American National Museum was a wonderful opportunity to help tell stories of families like mine,” she observed.“At Washington State Historical Society, I will work to preserve the diverse stories of my home state, and ensure we are moving the collection forward through digitization, while also collecting in new ways as we are doing during this pandemic,” Wetherbee said, inviting all Washingtonians to contribute to collections and offer ideas about what the Historical Society should collect by emailing [email protected]last_img read more